The failed war on drugs
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The failed war on drugs

The failed war on drugs

Since 1970, the US has spent $1 trillion on the war on drugs. That's $793 per second, or $25 billion per year. Infographic continues with more stunning facts.

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Samsgimp Samsgimp (2105 days ago)
It is a fact that we all, to varying degrees and varying ways, have a predilection for getting 'high' and prohibition in any country has never worked and very recently the Justice Secretary Kenneth Clarke said The UK is “plainly losing” the war on drugs - and may even be going backwards. So my proposal is multifaceted and in no particular order. - Drug addicts or anyone who's use of any harmful substance that causes them a problem to be registered as having an illness and therefore to be treated initially by their GP as a patient in confidence. - Those who are addicted to harder drugs to be given a clean and free regulated supply in a safe environment possibly on a gradual reduction and / or offered residential treatment programs if applicable. Therefor current users now won't need dealers... - All controlled drugs to be de-criminalized for the user and softer recreational drugs only available through government outlets, where quality is high and the price is standardised. and the uk govt to make stacks of legal dough - Maybe a recreational drug i.d card that is presented to the outlet ensuring that the user is over 18 and is allowed, say, no more than 5g of marijuana or 1g of coke per week... - Any country with a genuine interest in combating the harmful effects of the illicit drug trade on the wider community and the drugs on individual users colludes to buy all the opium and cocaine direct from the farmers, cutting out terrorists and criminals from their main source of income. - No more high end drug crime, no more cosa nostra, no more Taliban. no more dead uk soldiers. - No more domestic drug dealing which has the added bonus of not exposing potential new users from trying hard(er) drugs. - No more domestic drug-related crime. - Domestic Insurance costs down, - Cost to the taxpayer down. - Secure and cheap source of pain-relieving raw materials for hospitals - No more overdoses - No more poisoning thru impurities - Reduction in spread of hiv / aids and hepatitis- - more money be available for awareness and education _ reduced overcrowding of jails etc etc etc - more suggestions welcome..
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Original comment
It is a fact that we all, to varying degrees and varying ways, have a predilection for getting 'high' and prohibition in any country has never worked and very recently the Justice Secretary Kenneth Clarke said The UK is “plainly losing” the war on drugs - and may even be going backwards. So my proposal is multifaceted and in no particular order. - Drug addicts or anyone who's use of any harmful substance that causes them a problem to be registered as having an illness and therefore to be treated initially by their GP as a patient in confidence. - Those who are addicted to harder drugs to be given a clean and free regulated supply in a safe environment possibly on a gradual reduction and / or offered residential treatment programs if applicable. Therefor current users now won't need dealers... - All controlled drugs to be de-criminalized for the user and softer recreational drugs only available through government outlets, where quality is high and the price is standardised. and the uk govt to make stacks of legal dough - Maybe a recreational drug i.d card that is presented to the outlet ensuring that the user is over 18 and is allowed, say, no more than 5g of marijuana or 1g of coke per week... - Any country with a genuine interest in combating the harmful effects of the illicit drug trade on the wider community and the drugs on individual users colludes to buy all the opium and cocaine direct from the farmers, cutting out terrorists and criminals from their main source of income. - No more high end drug crime, no more cosa nostra, no more Taliban. no more dead uk soldiers. - No more domestic drug dealing which has the added bonus of not exposing potential new users from trying hard(er) drugs. - No more domestic drug-related crime. - Domestic Insurance costs down, - Cost to the taxpayer down. - Secure and cheap source of pain-relieving raw materials for hospitals - No more overdoses - No more poisoning thru impurities - Reduction in spread of hiv / aids and hepatitis- - more money be available for awareness and education _ reduced overcrowding of jails etc etc etc - more suggestions welcome..
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TheBob TheBob (2105 days ago)
In the UK it was possible to register as an addict, receive counselling, treatment, clean needles and a decreasing amount of the drug. And it worked very well, I believe - till that b***h Thatcher decided to stick her oar in.
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In the UK it was possible to register as an addict, receive counselling, treatment, clean needles and a decreasing amount of the drug. And it worked very well, I believe - till that b***h Thatcher decided to stick her oar in.
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Guest: whizz (2105 days ago)
Sam - You are correct but what s needed is a short version. I suggest something on the lines of "There will always be a market in drugs. Who will control it? The government or the dealers?"
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Sam - You are correct but what s needed is a short version. I suggest something on the lines of "There will always be a market in drugs. Who will control it? The government or the dealers?"
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glortman glortman (2104 days ago)
Latest comment: Whizz, your style is a little terse, but you are a remarkable editor. Well stated.
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Latest comment: Whizz, your style is a little terse, but you are a remarkable editor. Well stated.
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