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LS3 follow tight

LS3 follow tight

(4:04) Follow the leader, at least for now. Researchers from DARPA's LS3 program demonstrated new advances in the LS3's control, stability and manoeuvrability, "Leader Follow" decision making, enhanced roll recovery, exact foot placement over rough terrain, ability to manoeuvre in an urban environment, and verbal command capability.

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London1 London1 (1819 days ago)
Terrifying. In 20 years they'll have robot fighting dogs!
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Terrifying. In 20 years they'll have robot fighting dogs!
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glortman glortman (1817 days ago)
Latest comment: I say send the robot fighting dogs to war, and let the soldiers on both sides have a beer together.
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Latest comment: I say send the robot fighting dogs to war, and let the soldiers on both sides have a beer together.
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Guest: Submitted as a Guest (1819 days ago)
Hmm, hardly beeing a T1. Sad to think about being eliminated by a woky chubby dog like robot.
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Hmm, hardly beeing a T1. Sad to think about being eliminated by a woky chubby dog like robot.
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cengland0 cengland0 (1819 days ago)
That "Leader Follow" might not work as nicely if there were multiple people involved. Does it really know who to follow in that situation? I doubt it runs on a bunch of AA batteries so how long can it go on a single charge? Seems like a power-hungry beast to me.
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That "Leader Follow" might not work as nicely if there were multiple people involved. Does it really know who to follow in that situation? I doubt it runs on a bunch of AA batteries so how long can it go on a single charge? Seems like a power-hungry beast to me.
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Guest: Boston Dynamics Research Team (1819 days ago)
All good points, we're working on them
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All good points, we're working on them
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Guest: Mooky (1819 days ago)
Interesting. I wonder how advanced these will be in say, 20 years time Good work guys.
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Interesting. I wonder how advanced these will be in say, 20 years time Good work guys.
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glortman glortman (1819 days ago)
LS3 is powered by an internal combustion engine, like the BigDog, not batteries. I am not sure about the follow mode, but it would be very easy to use either passive or active sensors on the leader/squad members to make it follow the correct person. It could be also be done with perceptual algorithms, but I understand they are trying to keep the computing simple.
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LS3 is powered by an internal combustion engine, like the BigDog, not batteries. I am not sure about the follow mode, but it would be very easy to use either passive or active sensors on the leader/squad members to make it follow the correct person. It could be also be done with perceptual algorithms, but I understand they are trying to keep the computing simple.
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cengland0 cengland0 (1818 days ago)
perceptual algorithms may not work. Imagine if there were multiple people dressed alike (not unusual in a war zone), and the people moved over a hill or behind an object, how would this device re-acquire the correct leader? What if the leader is shot and killed, can someone then give new verbal commands to have it follow them instead? How does this device know who is giving the commands unless something is built into the radio like a beacon to have it follow the radio instead of the person. But then what happens if the radio gets into enemy hands. The payload that it's carrying could also end up in enemy hands.
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perceptual algorithms may not work. Imagine if there were multiple people dressed alike (not unusual in a war zone), and the people moved over a hill or behind an object, how would this device re-acquire the correct leader? What if the leader is shot and killed, can someone then give new verbal commands to have it follow them instead? How does this device know who is giving the commands unless something is built into the radio like a beacon to have it follow the radio instead of the person. But then what happens if the radio gets into enemy hands. The payload that it's carrying could also end up in enemy hands.
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glortman glortman (1818 days ago)
You are quite right. They might not work. They don't always work for humans either, as can be seen in any change blindness video. Some identification systems currently being developed using face and voice recognition are fairly sophisticated, but ultimately rf tags hidden in the uniform or (here's where we get a little creepy and futuristic) skin of the combatant could provide a good signal that could be switched among combatants. Every asset is always at risk of compromise by the enemy, and if the combatants are killed, the LS3 and payload could be programmed to self-destruct (or return to base)
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You are quite right. They might not work. They don't always work for humans either, as can be seen in any change blindness video. Some identification systems currently being developed using face and voice recognition are fairly sophisticated, but ultimately rf tags hidden in the uniform or (here's where we get a little creepy and futuristic) skin of the combatant could provide a good signal that could be switched among combatants. Every asset is always at risk of compromise by the enemy, and if the combatants are killed, the LS3 and payload could be programmed to self-destruct (or return to base)
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glortman glortman (1818 days ago)
Here is a change blindness video. LINK
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Here is a change blindness video. LINK
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cengland0 cengland0 (1818 days ago)
That was a good one but I have a link to a funnier one (IMHO): LINK
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That was a good one but I have a link to a funnier one (IMHO): LINK
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Blong Blong (1819 days ago)
I'd like to see how it handles a grizzly
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I'd like to see how it handles a grizzly
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