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First day of Bradley Manning's trial

First day of Bradley Manning's trial

(1:17) June 3, 2013: Bradley Manning, the US soldier who leaked state secrets to WikiLeaks, faces a maximum sentence of life in military custody with no possible parole. After three years in custody waiting, his trial has finally begun.

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Guest: guest123456789 (1654 days ago)
i'm neutral on this one. on one hand he exposed some bad things, on the other hand he betrayed his country. Don't know what to think.
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i'm neutral on this one. on one hand he exposed some bad things, on the other hand he betrayed his country. Don't know what to think.
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TheBob TheBob (1654 days ago)
Yes I know what you mean - but HOW he has been confined seems inhumane and vindictive
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Yes I know what you mean - but HOW he has been confined seems inhumane and vindictive
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Guest: guest123456789 (1654 days ago)
it does seem so, but i don't know what the US military laws say about this.
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it does seem so, but i don't know what the US military laws say about this.
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TheBob TheBob (1653 days ago)
I wonder who could tell us?
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I wonder who could tell us?
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Guest: guest123456789 (1653 days ago)
yes, i wonder that too sometimes. do you happen to know who might help?
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yes, i wonder that too sometimes. do you happen to know who might help?
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cengland0 cengland0 (1653 days ago)
A quick search says he was charged with 22 violations including violations of Articles 92 and 134 of the Uniform Code of Military Justice LINK , and of the Espionage Act LINK . The most serious charge is "aiding the enemy," a capital offense. A capital offense deserves the death penalty but that penalty has been rare so they are only seeking life in prison. He pleaded guilty to 10 of the charges probably to avoid the death penalty.
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A quick search says he was charged with 22 violations including violations of Articles 92 and 134 of the Uniform Code of Military Justice LINK , and of the Espionage Act LINK . The most serious charge is "aiding the enemy," a capital offense. A capital offense deserves the death penalty but that penalty has been rare so they are only seeking life in prison. He pleaded guilty to 10 of the charges probably to avoid the death penalty.
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TheBob TheBob (1653 days ago)
Excellent timing! Now, the question is not so much is he guilty of whatever - but are they using extreme solitary confinement as extra punishment. Who else gets treated like this?
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Excellent timing! Now, the question is not so much is he guilty of whatever - but are they using extreme solitary confinement as extra punishment. Who else gets treated like this?
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cengland0 cengland0 (1653 days ago)
Well, he did plead guilty so he deserves some sort of punishment. Regarding solitary confinement, that's usually done for political, famous, and infamous people. Putting people like that into general population can get them killed as many people would like their head as a trophy. They can probably request to be put into general population but it is usually not recommended.
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Well, he did plead guilty so he deserves some sort of punishment. Regarding solitary confinement, that's usually done for political, famous, and infamous people. Putting people like that into general population can get them killed as many people would like their head as a trophy. They can probably request to be put into general population but it is usually not recommended.
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Guest: guest123456789 (1653 days ago)
makes sense to me. Besides, he kinda asked for it.
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makes sense to me. Besides, he kinda asked for it.
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Guest: Sad for my country (1648 days ago)
Latest comment: So, if you felt that there were lies that the people of the country should know about going on in front of you, you wouldn't try to leak that info to the media and inform the masses that there is wrongdoing in the military? Wow, great ethics there. One week of the trial has passed and no one was hurt by the information getting out, only embarrassed. So, death, solitary confinment and abuse, treated like he's Osama Bin Laden's go to guy, spending the rest of his life in prison. That's screwed up if you ask me. There is a book that details (so i am told - just found out tonight about it- Truth and consequences, if you actually want to be informed on what he exactly did before sentencing him. This isn't Jody Arias, this could be anyone who loved their country and saw wrong doings. BTW he plead to the charges that he did as a plea to not kill him. So, in my opinion that is the court forcing him to lie or risk death. It's done all the time to people.
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Latest comment: So, if you felt that there were lies that the people of the country should know about going on in front of you, you wouldn't try to leak that info to the media and inform the masses that there is wrongdoing in the military? Wow, great ethics there. One week of the trial has passed and no one was hurt by the information getting out, only embarrassed. So, death, solitary confinment and abuse, treated like he's Osama Bin Laden's go to guy, spending the rest of his life in prison. That's screwed up if you ask me. There is a book that details (so i am told - just found out tonight about it- Truth and consequences, if you actually want to be informed on what he exactly did before sentencing him. This isn't Jody Arias, this could be anyone who loved their country and saw wrong doings. BTW he plead to the charges that he did as a plea to not kill him. So, in my opinion that is the court forcing him to lie or risk death. It's done all the time to people.
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