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British numbers confuse AmericansBritish numbers confuse Americans

(14:30) Two Americans living in England discuss the British numeric nuances that cause them problems.

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Guest: Americans are right. (453 days ago)
Of course 2001 is two thousand one NOT two thousand and one. If you were to say 2327, would you say two thousand and three hundred and twenty and seven? Of course not. It's properly stated as two thousand three hundred twenty seven.
Original comment
Of course 2001 is two thousand one NOT two thousand and one. If you were to say 2327, would you say two thousand and three hundred and twenty and seven? Of course not. It's properly stated as two thousand three hundred twenty seven.
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Guest: Culley (453 days ago)
Troll or just dim? The tens/units (those are the small numbers less than 100 FYI) are preceded with an 'and'. So 2327 would be two thousand, three hundred AND twenty seven.
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Troll or just dim? The tens/units (those are the small numbers less than 100 FYI) are preceded with an 'and'. So 2327 would be two thousand, three hundred AND twenty seven.
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Guest: Americans are right. (453 days ago)
And where is your reference?
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And where is your reference?
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Filmaddict Filmaddict (453 days ago)
Considering ENGLISH derived from the BRITISH, I think you can safely assume we know what we're talking about! *eye-roll*. How on earth do you write your cheques?
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Considering ENGLISH derived from the BRITISH, I think you can safely assume we know what we're talking about! *eye-roll*. How on earth do you write your cheques?
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Guest: Americans are right. (453 days ago)
We write checks from our checking account -- not cheques from chequing accounts. If English is derived from the British, that just means we perfected a defective language.
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We write checks from our checking account -- not cheques from chequing accounts. If English is derived from the British, that just means we perfected a defective language.
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TheBob TheBob (452 days ago)
If I *did* write a cheque it would be from my *current* account - but I normally use online banking.
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If I *did* write a cheque it would be from my *current* account - but I normally use online banking.
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UncleSam UncleSam (452 days ago)
We Americans have had a great and positive influence on the English language, developing it in such a way that teleologically made it our own. In terms population, America has more people and so obviously, our influence will be continue to be greater as the language continues to evolve. British people always come off as pedantic and snobbish whenever they try to "correct" grammatical differences that develop naturally across cultures and societies. Here is the thing: you might think that you are correct; however, the other person thinks that you are too! In fact, many of the perceived "errors" that you see are merely stylistic or cultural differences. Furthermore, it turns out that it is you (Britons) who are in the minority, and, when it comes to the evolution of language, you can kick and scream as much as you'd like but you will never "win" (whatever that would mean.)
Original comment
We Americans have had a great and positive influence on the English language, developing it in such a way that teleologically made it our own. In terms population, America has more people and so obviously, our influence will be continue to be greater as the language continues to evolve. British people always come off as pedantic and snobbish whenever they try to "correct" grammatical differences that develop naturally across cultures and societies. Here is the thing: you might think that you are correct; however, the other person thinks that you are too! In fact, many of the perceived "errors" that you see are merely stylistic or cultural differences. Furthermore, it turns out that it is you (Britons) who are in the minority, and, when it comes to the evolution of language, you can kick and scream as much as you'd like but you will never "win" (whatever that would mean.)
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GrammarPolice GrammarPolice (452 days ago)
'Allo, 'allo. What's all this then?
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'Allo, 'allo. What's all this then?
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Guest:  (451 days ago)
and yet you still use the 'English' language....from England! Tell you what, as you made so many 'improvements', take it and call in Americanish, and leave English alone!
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and yet you still use the 'English' language....from England! Tell you what, as you made so many 'improvements', take it and call in Americanish, and leave English alone!
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Guest: Americans are right. (451 days ago)
The Spanish language they speak in Spain is much different than what they speak in Mexico and those are different from Puerto Rico but they are all called Spanish. If you were to purchase Spanish from Rosetta Stone, you need to specify Latin versus regular. Different versions of Spanish may have developed on their own due to their separation and English has as well. However, in America, a guy named Noah Webster was concerned about the huge inconsistencies in the English language and worked to fix those by correcting the spelling of several of the words. This is partial fixing of a defective language. His spelling reform was featured in his first dictionary and we still use those changes today. Regarding naming it Americanish, we do call it American English to differentiate it from UK English but most people just say they speak "English" without specifying which. Who knows why the people in the UK call trunks as boots, trucks as lorry, and elevators as lifts.
Original comment
The Spanish language they speak in Spain is much different than what they speak in Mexico and those are different from Puerto Rico but they are all called Spanish. If you were to purchase Spanish from Rosetta Stone, you need to specify Latin versus regular. Different versions of Spanish may have developed on their own due to their separation and English has as well. However, in America, a guy named Noah Webster was concerned about the huge inconsistencies in the English language and worked to fix those by correcting the spelling of several of the words. This is partial fixing of a defective language. His spelling reform was featured in his first dictionary and we still use those changes today. Regarding naming it Americanish, we do call it American English to differentiate it from UK English but most people just say they speak "English" without specifying which. Who knows why the people in the UK call trunks as boots, trucks as lorry, and elevators as lifts.
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TheBob TheBob (451 days ago)
And who knows why so many American men wear suspenders...
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And who knows why so many American men wear suspenders...
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Guest: Nick Poole (448 days ago)
Latest comment: Hi UncleSam, not to be pedantic and snobbish, but you can't use 'teleologically' like this. When something is teleological, it is geared toward a finite goal, allied to the philosophical idea that final causes exist in nature. I'm not sure how making something one's own can be teleological, unless the whole of the United States of America were a person, and it was your definite goal to lay claim to language. I know you have big ideas over there, but I'd be surprised if that was one of them. In general, as a linguist, I would tend to agree with you - language is in a permanent state of flux, and it is constantly 'owned' by whomever is using it. It is, joyfully, a commons, and we are all at liberty to innovate neologisms to our heart's content. Of course, this constantly shifting quality to language does not mean it isn't possible to make mistakes. In your second sentence, you missed out the preposition 'of' (as in 'In term *of* population...'). That's a mistake in terms of the general understanding of the clausal phrase 'in terms of...' and its accepted use. And when it comes to minorities, I suspect that there are more Chinese English language speakers than Americans and Britons combined! I think we all have to come to terms with a new world order!
Original comment
Latest comment: Hi UncleSam, not to be pedantic and snobbish, but you can't use 'teleologically' like this. When something is teleological, it is geared toward a finite goal, allied to the philosophical idea that final causes exist in nature. I'm not sure how making something one's own can be teleological, unless the whole of the United States of America were a person, and it was your definite goal to lay claim to language. I know you have big ideas over there, but I'd be surprised if that was one of them. In general, as a linguist, I would tend to agree with you - language is in a permanent state of flux, and it is constantly 'owned' by whomever is using it. It is, joyfully, a commons, and we are all at liberty to innovate neologisms to our heart's content. Of course, this constantly shifting quality to language does not mean it isn't possible to make mistakes. In your second sentence, you missed out the preposition 'of' (as in 'In term *of* population...'). That's a mistake in terms of the general understanding of the clausal phrase 'in terms of...' and its accepted use. And when it comes to minorities, I suspect that there are more Chinese English language speakers than Americans and Britons combined! I think we all have to come to terms with a new world order!
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Guest: Trucker9900 (452 days ago)
We Canadians do both - poor Americans, so easily confused.
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We Canadians do both - poor Americans, so easily confused.
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Guest:  (452 days ago)
"Here is the thing: you might think that you are correct; however, the other person thinks that you are too!" Thanks Uncle Sam. Big of you to admit it.
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"Here is the thing: you might think that you are correct; however, the other person thinks that you are too!" Thanks Uncle Sam. Big of you to admit it.
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UncleSam UncleSam (451 days ago)
"they" is what I meant to type... :)
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"they" is what I meant to type... :)
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Guest: Oskar1 (453 days ago)
stupid muricans, just send me your credit card details and i will let you know how to say it.
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stupid muricans, just send me your credit card details and i will let you know how to say it.
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Guest: kat (453 days ago)
I agree with them totally, I have always thought that it is a stupid thing to say when you are trying to write down a message. Instead of just writing it down you have to stop and think to not write down the double bit or triple bit.
Original comment
I agree with them totally, I have always thought that it is a stupid thing to say when you are trying to write down a message. Instead of just writing it down you have to stop and think to not write down the double bit or triple bit.
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