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Soda Pop Coke

Soda Pop Coke

(4:05) Based on the 2003 Harvard Dialect Survey, which maps out the various dialects of American speech. More about this: http://iurl.no/z7aoi

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cengland0 cengland0 (1476 days ago)
Everyone that stated a moot point is one that is not worth discussing any further (or the topic has been closed) is wrong. Seems everyone has been using that incorrectly for such a long time that it has become a standard. A moot point is a topic that is debatable, disputable, and does not have a final decision. It is technically the exact opposite of what most people think it means. This shows that too many people are followers of others without confirming information for themselves. Another one that is a pet peeve of mine is "anxious". People will say that they are anxious to get off work today because they have a party to go to. The word is from "anxiety" so it means you're worried or nervous about it. Just like moot, people have used this word incorrectly so often that it has become to mean they are eager. Eager and nervous do not seem like synonyms to me.
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Everyone that stated a moot point is one that is not worth discussing any further (or the topic has been closed) is wrong. Seems everyone has been using that incorrectly for such a long time that it has become a standard. A moot point is a topic that is debatable, disputable, and does not have a final decision. It is technically the exact opposite of what most people think it means. This shows that too many people are followers of others without confirming information for themselves. Another one that is a pet peeve of mine is "anxious". People will say that they are anxious to get off work today because they have a party to go to. The word is from "anxiety" so it means you're worried or nervous about it. Just like moot, people have used this word incorrectly so often that it has become to mean they are eager. Eager and nervous do not seem like synonyms to me.
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Guest: Bofus (1473 days ago)
But I hope you concede that language evolves to far beyond what the words may originally have meant. Definitions of words are descriptive, not prescriptive, which is why when people have been 'misusing' a word for an amount of time it often becomes accepted and is listed in dictionaries. I wonder if people like you once quibbled when people used the words 'awful', 'nice', 'gay', 'fantastic' in the current senses of the words.
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But I hope you concede that language evolves to far beyond what the words may originally have meant. Definitions of words are descriptive, not prescriptive, which is why when people have been 'misusing' a word for an amount of time it often becomes accepted and is listed in dictionaries. I wonder if people like you once quibbled when people used the words 'awful', 'nice', 'gay', 'fantastic' in the current senses of the words.
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cengland0 cengland0 (1473 days ago)
Latest comment: I don't mind when the language evolves to give a word a secondary meaning. An example you gave of "gay" originally meaning happy to also include the definition of homosexual is not a problem because the definitions do not conflict. I dislike it when the meaning becomes the exact opposite. Moot means the opposite of what people think. Anxious means the opposite of what people think. That is a problem when a word evolves to a point that it does a 180 degree turn. So when someone uses that word, it gives the listener or reader doubt about which of the definitions they intended. If I told you, "I literally rolled on the floor laughing out loud" would you think I really rolled on the floor or was that just a figure of speech and I didn't roll on the floor? Do you see the problem now?
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Latest comment: I don't mind when the language evolves to give a word a secondary meaning. An example you gave of "gay" originally meaning happy to also include the definition of homosexual is not a problem because the definitions do not conflict. I dislike it when the meaning becomes the exact opposite. Moot means the opposite of what people think. Anxious means the opposite of what people think. That is a problem when a word evolves to a point that it does a 180 degree turn. So when someone uses that word, it gives the listener or reader doubt about which of the definitions they intended. If I told you, "I literally rolled on the floor laughing out loud" would you think I really rolled on the floor or was that just a figure of speech and I didn't roll on the floor? Do you see the problem now?
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