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Sam Harris - It is always now

Sam Harris - It is always now

(5:43) American author, philosopher and neuroscientist Sam Harris gives the prescription for living life to the full.

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Guest: (1418 days ago)
Why is his narrative so alike to Buddhism?
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Why is his narrative so alike to Buddhism?
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Guest: (1416 days ago)
Ha! It absolutely isn't, you should research Buddhism for 30 seconds or so. There's nothing here about the key Buddhist concepts of karma, nirvana, tilakhana, the noble truths, etc etc etc. This talk is essentially about mindfulness which is only one tiny part of Buddhism and has been developed by many philosophers and life coaches since.
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Ha! It absolutely isn't, you should research Buddhism for 30 seconds or so. There's nothing here about the key Buddhist concepts of karma, nirvana, tilakhana, the noble truths, etc etc etc. This talk is essentially about mindfulness which is only one tiny part of Buddhism and has been developed by many philosophers and life coaches since.
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Guest: (1416 days ago)
Actually, it's Buddhist concept of past, present and future, but never mind.
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Actually, it's Buddhist concept of past, present and future, but never mind.
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Guest: (1416 days ago)
Latest comment: Yeah perhaps there's a little more to Buddhism but don't worry about it.
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Latest comment: Yeah perhaps there's a little more to Buddhism but don't worry about it.
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Guest: TheMaldonian (1417 days ago)
I look forward to watching this tomorrow.
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I look forward to watching this tomorrow.
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Guest: Melon Colic (1416 days ago)
The past and the future, or at least thoughts about them, are often a way of distracting us from the present moment. This idea presumes that the present moment is more pleasurable, whereas of course for many people in all kinds of situations living and experiencing 'now' is deeply painful. Would they teach this to elderly and disabled residents of nursing homes for example?
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The past and the future, or at least thoughts about them, are often a way of distracting us from the present moment. This idea presumes that the present moment is more pleasurable, whereas of course for many people in all kinds of situations living and experiencing 'now' is deeply painful. Would they teach this to elderly and disabled residents of nursing homes for example?
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Guest: (1416 days ago)
So do you have another alternative other than the delusion in which most people currently live their lives, to add to the suggestion which Sam gives, which is to face that pain now and change it? Over time, your scenario wouldn't exist as people would improve their "now" and not dwell on the past or delude themselves of future bliss.
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So do you have another alternative other than the delusion in which most people currently live their lives, to add to the suggestion which Sam gives, which is to face that pain now and change it? Over time, your scenario wouldn't exist as people would improve their "now" and not dwell on the past or delude themselves of future bliss.
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Guest: Melon Colic (1416 days ago)
Sure, I'm suggesting that the idea of living in the moment, as espoused by various theorists, is fine for people who are still in control of their lives. However, for others that could include for example the elderly and disabled, the imprisoned, for whom focusing on the past or focusing on the future is not only beneficial and comforting but pretty much essential for their survival. And that scenario I'm afraid will continue to exist. Try telling a 98 year old bed-ridden Parkinson's sufferer to 'live in the moment'.
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Sure, I'm suggesting that the idea of living in the moment, as espoused by various theorists, is fine for people who are still in control of their lives. However, for others that could include for example the elderly and disabled, the imprisoned, for whom focusing on the past or focusing on the future is not only beneficial and comforting but pretty much essential for their survival. And that scenario I'm afraid will continue to exist. Try telling a 98 year old bed-ridden Parkinson's sufferer to 'live in the moment'.
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