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Humans need not apply

Humans need not apply

(15:01) Robots are not coming to take your job, they are already here. CGP Grey looks at how automation will take over your job. cgpgrey.com

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cengland0 cengland0 (1193 days ago)

This is why productivity has increased so much, not because people are working harder. Explains why income has not kept up with productivity.

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This is why productivity has increased so much, not because people are working harder. Explains why income has not kept up with productivity.

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WalterEgo WalterEgo (1193 days ago)

So what is your solution to the problem of humans going the way of horses?

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So what is your solution to the problem of humans going the way of horses?

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cengland0 cengland0 (1193 days ago)

Like the video said, employee expenses is a huge component that affects the bottom line.

Many people are willing to work for less but the government refuses to allow people to work less than a minimum wage. So it becomes cheaper for companies to automate things to avoid those high employee expenses. If the people worked cheaper than the cost and maintenance of a machine, it would make more sense to keep the human.

Also, your question alluding to it being a “problem” is sort of flawed. It makes perfect sense to create better technologies to reduce the human efforts required to do a job. This is not a problem.

Today there are people unable to find a job so the government subsidizes their income 100%. If they were able to get a job making a small amount of money, the government would subsidize the employee less and that saves money for the government, the tax payer, decreases the unemployment rate, and gives employers the help they need at affordable rates.

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Like the video said, employee expenses is a huge component that affects the bottom line.

Many people are willing to work for less but the government refuses to allow people to work less than a minimum wage. So it becomes cheaper for companies to automate things to avoid those high employee expenses. If the people worked cheaper than the cost and maintenance of a machine, it would make more sense to keep the human.

Also, your question alluding to it being a “problem” is sort of flawed. It makes perfect sense to create better technologies to reduce the human efforts required to do a job. This is not a problem.

Today there are people unable to find a job so the government subsidizes their income 100%. If they were able to get a job making a small amount of money, the government would subsidize the employee less and that saves money for the government, the tax payer, decreases the unemployment rate, and gives employers the help they need at affordable rates.

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WalterEgo WalterEgo (1193 days ago)

What happens when there are more people than jobs? Is that not a problem?

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What happens when there are more people than jobs? Is that not a problem?

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cengland0 cengland0 (1193 days ago)

That is only a problem when you have salaries that are too high. If the salary is low, as a business owner, I would hire a whole lot more people.

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That is only a problem when you have salaries that are too high. If the salary is low, as a business owner, I would hire a whole lot more people.

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WalterEgo WalterEgo (1193 days ago)

Do you think humans will always be cheaper than robots?

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Do you think humans will always be cheaper than robots?

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cengland0 cengland0 (1193 days ago)

I think you misunderstood me. Robots are cheaper in the long-term for jobs that are consistent and needed for a long term and for high volume jobs.

Have you called a business and had a voice response unit attempt to help answer the majority of your questions before you can get to a real person? That "robot" is there to reduce the number of employees needed to answer those calls. The robot is cheaper in that situation.

If you wanted someone to assemble 100 widgets, it would be too expensive to create a robot to do that when you could hire a person to do that one time. However, if you will be creating millions of those widgets, it may make sense to get a robot to do it.

Understand that now?

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I think you misunderstood me. Robots are cheaper in the long-term for jobs that are consistent and needed for a long term and for high volume jobs.

Have you called a business and had a voice response unit attempt to help answer the majority of your questions before you can get to a real person? That "robot" is there to reduce the number of employees needed to answer those calls. The robot is cheaper in that situation.

If you wanted someone to assemble 100 widgets, it would be too expensive to create a robot to do that when you could hire a person to do that one time. However, if you will be creating millions of those widgets, it may make sense to get a robot to do it.

Understand that now?

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WalterEgo WalterEgo (1193 days ago)

Didn't you watch the video? Robots are getting very smart. A robot could figure out how to assemble 100 widgets much faster and better than any human - day and night, never tiring, never striking, never complaining - switching tasks and learning new skills when necessary. If that's not possible today, it will be tomorrow.

So I ask you again, what happens when there are more people than jobs?

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Didn't you watch the video? Robots are getting very smart. A robot could figure out how to assemble 100 widgets much faster and better than any human - day and night, never tiring, never striking, never complaining - switching tasks and learning new skills when necessary. If that's not possible today, it will be tomorrow.

So I ask you again, what happens when there are more people than jobs?

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Guest: Casey (1193 days ago)

One thing I can see happening is things should get a lot cheaper because over time the labour component to make a widget, often the highest expense, will approach zero. Perhaps people won't need to earn as much, work as long or as hard....another thing is it could be self constraining as in if enough people don't have jobs and can't afford widgets then they won't be able to sell enough, there must be a balance there some where...but of course Cengland is right about minimum wages, regulations etc. Will force businesses to outsource to places like China, Vietnam etc. and the next logical step is robots.

so what do you think will happen Walter?

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One thing I can see happening is things should get a lot cheaper because over time the labour component to make a widget, often the highest expense, will approach zero. Perhaps people won't need to earn as much, work as long or as hard....another thing is it could be self constraining as in if enough people don't have jobs and can't afford widgets then they won't be able to sell enough, there must be a balance there some where...but of course Cengland is right about minimum wages, regulations etc. Will force businesses to outsource to places like China, Vietnam etc. and the next logical step is robots.

so what do you think will happen Walter?

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WalterEgo WalterEgo (1192 days ago)

Things have been getting cheaper due to technology for a long while. Your smartphone that costs a few hundred dollars, packs a bigger punch than a supercomputer of only a decade or so ago that cost millions. So does that mean you should take a wage cut, or work less?

cengland0 argues that if only poor people would accept a lower wage, then the incentive to create technology to replace them would not be there, therefore we wouldn't have the type of technology we have today, therefore poor people would all have jobs that they can't live on. But that's OK because they just need to better themselves and get a better paid job. If you can't see the flaw in that logic, then you are more stupid than me.

What would YOUR minimum wage be if you were desperate for a job? When would pride or dignity kick in before you said, "that's taking the piss, I'd rather turn to crime". $10 an hour? $10 a day? $10 a week?

I think there will be soon, if not already, more people than jobs. Rather than sticking our heads in the sand trying to come up with any reason not to change, we need to be smart and start thinking different. I quite like UBI (Universal Basic Income) as a way to solve this particular problem, at least in theory.

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Original comment

Things have been getting cheaper due to technology for a long while. Your smartphone that costs a few hundred dollars, packs a bigger punch than a supercomputer of only a decade or so ago that cost millions. So does that mean you should take a wage cut, or work less?

cengland0 argues that if only poor people would accept a lower wage, then the incentive to create technology to replace them would not be there, therefore we wouldn't have the type of technology we have today, therefore poor people would all have jobs that they can't live on. But that's OK because they just need to better themselves and get a better paid job. If you can't see the flaw in that logic, then you are more stupid than me.

What would YOUR minimum wage be if you were desperate for a job? When would pride or dignity kick in before you said, "that's taking the piss, I'd rather turn to crime". $10 an hour? $10 a day? $10 a week?

I think there will be soon, if not already, more people than jobs. Rather than sticking our heads in the sand trying to come up with any reason not to change, we need to be smart and start thinking different. I quite like UBI (Universal Basic Income) as a way to solve this particular problem, at least in theory.

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cengland0 cengland0 (1192 days ago)

“What would YOUR minimum wage be” Everyone is willing to work for a different wage. As for me, I have a full-time job and sufficient resources to retire now if I wanted. So I do not work for less than $100/hour and even then, I turn down jobs because I value my free time more than I value the money.

I cannot answer this same question for others because some people may be willing to earn enough for a meal every day whereas others may want to earn enough to become successful in life. That is the beauty of capitalism because you get out of society what you put into it.

Why do you think we export jobs to other countries where the labor is cheaper when we have unemployed people in our own country? Can you explain the economics of that?

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“What would YOUR minimum wage be” Everyone is willing to work for a different wage. As for me, I have a full-time job and sufficient resources to retire now if I wanted. So I do not work for less than $100/hour and even then, I turn down jobs because I value my free time more than I value the money.

I cannot answer this same question for others because some people may be willing to earn enough for a meal every day whereas others may want to earn enough to become successful in life. That is the beauty of capitalism because you get out of society what you put into it.

Why do you think we export jobs to other countries where the labor is cheaper when we have unemployed people in our own country? Can you explain the economics of that?

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cengland0 cengland0 (1192 days ago)

This is how competition in the marketplace works. There is an incentive to reduce the prices of goods sold because the consumer tends to buy products and services from the cheaper company, if everything else is equal. Competition is good for the economy and prevents one company from price gouging. If the prices remain low, then people don’t need to earn as much money to afford them.

In the past, technology has replaced some headcount but in general it sort of shifts job positions from labor to intelligence positions. For example, in my VRU (Voice Response Unit) example, some customer service associates may not have been hired but, instead, a few system engineers, software programers, and voice talent was hired instead.

For the customers, the VRU and ATM extends the availability of service beyond the regular business hours of the company so customers have access to service 24 hours a day improving the customer experience. In today’s society, would you bank with a company that doesn’t use VRU or ATM machines? You wouldn’t be able to withdraw any money unless the bank is open and you would need to speak directly with a teller just to get your balance information. Very inconvenient for the customer.

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This is how competition in the marketplace works. There is an incentive to reduce the prices of goods sold because the consumer tends to buy products and services from the cheaper company, if everything else is equal. Competition is good for the economy and prevents one company from price gouging. If the prices remain low, then people don’t need to earn as much money to afford them.

In the past, technology has replaced some headcount but in general it sort of shifts job positions from labor to intelligence positions. For example, in my VRU (Voice Response Unit) example, some customer service associates may not have been hired but, instead, a few system engineers, software programers, and voice talent was hired instead.

For the customers, the VRU and ATM extends the availability of service beyond the regular business hours of the company so customers have access to service 24 hours a day improving the customer experience. In today’s society, would you bank with a company that doesn’t use VRU or ATM machines? You wouldn’t be able to withdraw any money unless the bank is open and you would need to speak directly with a teller just to get your balance information. Very inconvenient for the customer.

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WalterEgo WalterEgo (1192 days ago)

Yes, we know all that. But what happens when there are more people than jobs? You dabble in politics, so what would your solution be? Or do you still think people will always be cheaper than robots?

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Yes, we know all that. But what happens when there are more people than jobs? You dabble in politics, so what would your solution be? Or do you still think people will always be cheaper than robots?

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iknowlessthanyoudo iknowlessthanyoudo (1191 days ago)
Latest comment:

Wars, epidemics and human sacrifices stopped wage stagflation in the past. Regulation of procreation is an inevitability.

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Latest comment:

Wars, epidemics and human sacrifices stopped wage stagflation in the past. Regulation of procreation is an inevitability.

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Guest: edwin armstrong (1193 days ago)

Fist and last word on automation

In the 1950s when Jimmy Hoffa, leader of the Teamsters union, was asked by a Ford executive how an early automated assembly line making cars would pay unions dues he replied: ''And how would you sell them your cars?''

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Fist and last word on automation

In the 1950s when Jimmy Hoffa, leader of the Teamsters union, was asked by a Ford executive how an early automated assembly line making cars would pay unions dues he replied: ''And how would you sell them your cars?''

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iknowlessthanyoudo iknowlessthanyoudo (1191 days ago)

The unemployed are absorbed on two fronts.

1) A ten-fold increase in the percentage of population in prison since 1930: LINK Thus, we have 1.1million law enforcement jobs with correlating increases of those employed constructing, maintaining and servicing prisons. LINK More

2) Since 2007, established store-front service enterprises have seen significant erosion of revenues to millions of suburban home-based dog sitting and grooming, hair and nail salons, massage parlors, photography studios, car repair shops, lawn and garden maintenance, housecleaning and handyman work, computer and cell phone repair, tailoring, personal chef services, bicycle repair, math and reading tutoring, personal physical training and coaching, etc. LINK

It will be challenging to keep riot police and prostitution from becoming major occupations by 2050.

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The unemployed are absorbed on two fronts.

1) A ten-fold increase in the percentage of population in prison since 1930: LINK Thus, we have 1.1million law enforcement jobs with correlating increases of those employed constructing, maintaining and servicing prisons. LINK More

2) Since 2007, established store-front service enterprises have seen significant erosion of revenues to millions of suburban home-based dog sitting and grooming, hair and nail salons, massage parlors, photography studios, car repair shops, lawn and garden maintenance, housecleaning and handyman work, computer and cell phone repair, tailoring, personal chef services, bicycle repair, math and reading tutoring, personal physical training and coaching, etc. LINK

It will be challenging to keep riot police and prostitution from becoming major occupations by 2050.

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