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Can you trust what you see?

Can you trust what you see?

(2:06) Experiment set up at the World Science Festival event "The Science of Justice: A Matter of Opinion" to see whether a thief could get away with a crime right in front of a roomful of attentive people. The result, five innocent men were condemned.

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Guest: (1179 days ago)

A BS exercise as the persons face was never exposed to most of the audience. They basically randomly picked a person. You can see from the camera angle that was beyond the front row of seats, it barely caught the side of his face. and for less than a second. How exactly can the audience pick someone when the cameras found it hard to capture his face, and the camera man was in on it.

The colour of the persons cloths would be a better exercise.

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A BS exercise as the persons face was never exposed to most of the audience. They basically randomly picked a person. You can see from the camera angle that was beyond the front row of seats, it barely caught the side of his face. and for less than a second. How exactly can the audience pick someone when the cameras found it hard to capture his face, and the camera man was in on it.

The colour of the persons cloths would be a better exercise.

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Guest: Raisin (1179 days ago)
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In my opinion, the point was that those in the audience would qualify for "eye witnesses", and as such could testify in the same way he describes at the end of the video.

As for being seen, I'm going to go out on a limb and say most thieves will at least make a moderate effort for people to not see their faces. "Eye witnesses" in court aren't unlikely to experience as little exposure.

I would agree though that some in the audience may have felt "obliged" to vote, and just made a pure guess which would throw everything off. Nonetheless, many far more controlled experiments have given similar results to this, which is still interesting to me.

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Original comment
Latest comment:

In my opinion, the point was that those in the audience would qualify for "eye witnesses", and as such could testify in the same way he describes at the end of the video.

As for being seen, I'm going to go out on a limb and say most thieves will at least make a moderate effort for people to not see their faces. "Eye witnesses" in court aren't unlikely to experience as little exposure.

I would agree though that some in the audience may have felt "obliged" to vote, and just made a pure guess which would throw everything off. Nonetheless, many far more controlled experiments have given similar results to this, which is still interesting to me.

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