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F-22 Raptor night refuelling on operations over Syria

F-22 Raptor night refuelling on operations over Syria

(1:25) September 27, 2014: F-22 Raptor takes on fuel from a KC-10 Extender while on air strikes in Syria. Video by Sgt Russell Scalf.

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Guest: allahsuxcocx (1126 days ago)

as long as they are boming the crap out the muslim hordes who cares how much it costs, every penny well spent, safe flying guys, make sure you come home empty

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as long as they are boming the crap out the muslim hordes who cares how much it costs, every penny well spent, safe flying guys, make sure you come home empty

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Guest: Gizas (1127 days ago)

how many public schools can you build with the money paid for one of these?

now how many in liberia?

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how many public schools can you build with the money paid for one of these?

now how many in liberia?

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cengland0 cengland0 (1126 days ago)

It probably costs 361 million per F-22. On average, it costs $10,615 to send a single child to school for one year. So a single F-22 costs as much as sending 34,008 kids to school for one year.

Now that I answered your question, let me point out that those planes are there for defense. If everyone was dead because we did not have proper defense, would schooling be necessary?

In your opinion, is there a lack of schools in the USA that makes it so you think we need to sell off some of those planes so we can buy more schools?

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It probably costs 361 million per F-22. On average, it costs $10,615 to send a single child to school for one year. So a single F-22 costs as much as sending 34,008 kids to school for one year.

Now that I answered your question, let me point out that those planes are there for defense. If everyone was dead because we did not have proper defense, would schooling be necessary?

In your opinion, is there a lack of schools in the USA that makes it so you think we need to sell off some of those planes so we can buy more schools?

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WalterEgo WalterEgo (1126 days ago)

What a huge waste of money. An old F-16 could have done the same job for less.

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What a huge waste of money. An old F-16 could have done the same job for less.

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cengland0 cengland0 (1126 days ago)

I am not an expert with fighter aircraft but it would seem to me that the new plane costs more for a reason -- probably more functionality. I doubt the old plane is as good as the new technology.

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I am not an expert with fighter aircraft but it would seem to me that the new plane costs more for a reason -- probably more functionality. I doubt the old plane is as good as the new technology.

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WalterEgo WalterEgo (1126 days ago)

I'm not a military expert but I think we can safely assume that the F-22 is a more effective fighter than an F-16.

But my guess is that the difference between an F-22 and an F-16 against ISIS is negligible.

All the F-22 does is boost the arms race, at a huge cost to tax payers globally (Russian taxpayers pay for competing Russian jets, Chinese taxpayers pay for competing Chinese jets...), making the world a poorer place, while lining the pockets of Lockheed Martin and other arms manufacturers, giving them even more incentive to encourage wars, making the world a more dangerous place.

Other than that, the F-22 is quite cool.

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I'm not a military expert but I think we can safely assume that the F-22 is a more effective fighter than an F-16.

But my guess is that the difference between an F-22 and an F-16 against ISIS is negligible.

All the F-22 does is boost the arms race, at a huge cost to tax payers globally (Russian taxpayers pay for competing Russian jets, Chinese taxpayers pay for competing Chinese jets...), making the world a poorer place, while lining the pockets of Lockheed Martin and other arms manufacturers, giving them even more incentive to encourage wars, making the world a more dangerous place.

Other than that, the F-22 is quite cool.

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Guest: Gizas (1126 days ago)

not to mention drones

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not to mention drones

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cengland0 cengland0 (1126 days ago)

Drones are awesome. We can kill more bad people without putting our own men in harms way. They just get a bad reputation for no good reason. If the same people were killed by an F-22, would everyone be fine with that?

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Drones are awesome. We can kill more bad people without putting our own men in harms way. They just get a bad reputation for no good reason. If the same people were killed by an F-22, would everyone be fine with that?

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Guest: Gizas (1126 days ago)

you must have missed this report by John Oliver on drones.

LINK

How many public schools in Liberia again?

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you must have missed this report by John Oliver on drones.

LINK

How many public schools in Liberia again?

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Guest: Gizas (1126 days ago)

How many in LIBERIA?

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How many in LIBERIA?

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cengland0 cengland0 (1126 days ago)

I don't know and I don't care. It's the USA that purchased the plane -- not Liberia. So how could the cost savings of one country affect the schooling in another? We have our own budget deficit here and any savings should go to the American people -- not the schools of foreign countries.

One more point to add. In the USA, the national defense budget is from our national tax dollars. The schools are funded by the tax dollars collected at the local county and state levels. We have federal tax, state tax, county tax, and city tax. We also collect state sales tax and any local discretionary sales tax. For example, my state collects 6% but my specific county adds an additional 1% for a total of 7%. I pay property tax on more than one property and the majority of what is collected educates other people's children.

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Original comment

I don't know and I don't care. It's the USA that purchased the plane -- not Liberia. So how could the cost savings of one country affect the schooling in another? We have our own budget deficit here and any savings should go to the American people -- not the schools of foreign countries.

One more point to add. In the USA, the national defense budget is from our national tax dollars. The schools are funded by the tax dollars collected at the local county and state levels. We have federal tax, state tax, county tax, and city tax. We also collect state sales tax and any local discretionary sales tax. For example, my state collects 6% but my specific county adds an additional 1% for a total of 7%. I pay property tax on more than one property and the majority of what is collected educates other people's children.

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Guest: Gizas (1126 days ago)

nevermind that. How many schools can be bulit in Liberia for that money? By that i mean, contruction materials, labor, teacher's salaries, etc.

This is just a thought exercise, don't take it personally.

Consider their countries GDP is 1,469 million Euro's.

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Original comment

nevermind that. How many schools can be bulit in Liberia for that money? By that i mean, contruction materials, labor, teacher's salaries, etc.

This is just a thought exercise, don't take it personally.

Consider their countries GDP is 1,469 million Euro's.

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cengland0 cengland0 (1126 days ago)

According to this document: LINK on page 10 titled Budget Summary, the building of a school in the Bugbay Intersection is estimated at $405,653.75. So that means you could build almost 890 schools if they all cost about the same. This does not include the annual costs of running the school for staff, books, and electricity.

Your question is still ridiculous. Why didn't you ask how many schools could be built in Niger, Burundi, Zimbabwe, Eritrea, Madagascar, Central African Republic, Malawi, or the Congo for the price of a B-2 Spirit ($737 million) or an Airbus A340 ($600 million) or the Burj in Dubai ($3.8 billion).

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According to this document: LINK on page 10 titled Budget Summary, the building of a school in the Bugbay Intersection is estimated at $405,653.75. So that means you could build almost 890 schools if they all cost about the same. This does not include the annual costs of running the school for staff, books, and electricity.

Your question is still ridiculous. Why didn't you ask how many schools could be built in Niger, Burundi, Zimbabwe, Eritrea, Madagascar, Central African Republic, Malawi, or the Congo for the price of a B-2 Spirit ($737 million) or an Airbus A340 ($600 million) or the Burj in Dubai ($3.8 billion).

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Guest: Gizas (1126 days ago)

i just found this wikipedia (i know you don't like it) i counted about 140 schools in total in liberia.... makes you wonder.

I mentioned Liberia because that's what came to mine... you know,,, with all the ebola and stuff.

So with that money, you could double the number of schools in Liberia, create additional professional scools that teach willing adults a trade or a skill and still have some money left.

WOW. 1 million people at least will get some labor skills and basic education, and all for the cost of one F22... makes you wonder about the perversity of the world we live in.

ReplyVote up (111)down (97)
Original comment

i just found this wikipedia (i know you don't like it) i counted about 140 schools in total in liberia.... makes you wonder.

I mentioned Liberia because that's what came to mine... you know,,, with all the ebola and stuff.

So with that money, you could double the number of schools in Liberia, create additional professional scools that teach willing adults a trade or a skill and still have some money left.

WOW. 1 million people at least will get some labor skills and basic education, and all for the cost of one F22... makes you wonder about the perversity of the world we live in.

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cengland0 cengland0 (1126 days ago)

Not so fast. From what I understand about the current events in Liberia, it's not a lack of schools that prevent people from being educated. It's about the civil unrest in the region and the people that should be going to school trying to save their lives instead. Have you heard of a shortage of schools in Liberia as the root cause to poor education there?

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Not so fast. From what I understand about the current events in Liberia, it's not a lack of schools that prevent people from being educated. It's about the civil unrest in the region and the people that should be going to school trying to save their lives instead. Have you heard of a shortage of schools in Liberia as the root cause to poor education there?

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Guest: Gizas (1126 days ago)

you don't like Liberia, that's ok.

Pick a country and let's do the math LINK

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you don't like Liberia, that's ok.

Pick a country and let's do the math LINK

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Guest: Gizas (1126 days ago)

forgot to post the wiki link, oops LINK

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forgot to post the wiki link, oops LINK

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DrOfnothing DrOfnothing (1124 days ago)
Latest comment:

Round 1: US supports Iraq in the Iran-Iraq war, 100s of thousands die on both sides. Winner: no one.

Round 2: Iraq invades Kuwait, US-led coalition invades Iraq. Casualties: 5,000 Kuwaitis, 50k Iraqi military, 200k Iraqi civilians, 300 coalition forces. Winner: US-led coalition; Loser: Iraqi civilians.

Round 3: US invades Iraq again. 11 years later, after the longest continous war in US history, casualites including combat dead, ensuing civil war, disease, malnutrition, etc.: 340,000 Iraqis (90% civilian), 5,000 coalition. Cost $1.1 TRILLION. Loser: US taxpayer and Iraqi children.

So go ahead, enjoy the pretty lights on the pretty plane, you friggin' idiots.

ReplyVote up (109)down (157)
Original comment
Latest comment:

Round 1: US supports Iraq in the Iran-Iraq war, 100s of thousands die on both sides. Winner: no one.

Round 2: Iraq invades Kuwait, US-led coalition invades Iraq. Casualties: 5,000 Kuwaitis, 50k Iraqi military, 200k Iraqi civilians, 300 coalition forces. Winner: US-led coalition; Loser: Iraqi civilians.

Round 3: US invades Iraq again. 11 years later, after the longest continous war in US history, casualites including combat dead, ensuing civil war, disease, malnutrition, etc.: 340,000 Iraqis (90% civilian), 5,000 coalition. Cost $1.1 TRILLION. Loser: US taxpayer and Iraqi children.

So go ahead, enjoy the pretty lights on the pretty plane, you friggin' idiots.

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