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The ethical dilemma of self-driving cars

The ethical dilemma of self-driving cars

(4:15) Self-driving cars are already cruising the streets today, but how should they be programmed for unavoidable accidents? Patrick Lin navigates the murky ethics of self-driving cars. youtube.com/user/TEDEducation

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Guest: (681 days ago)

How should they be programmed to avoid accidents ?

puncture the tyres.

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How should they be programmed to avoid accidents ?

puncture the tyres.

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Guest: 8273648 (681 days ago)

How about slamming the brakes on! (Without any swerving) Self-drive cars are programmed to drive at a safe speed, so they can stop within the distance seen to be clear. No ethics - just common sense!

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How about slamming the brakes on! (Without any swerving) Self-drive cars are programmed to drive at a safe speed, so they can stop within the distance seen to be clear. No ethics - just common sense!

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Guest: Guesting (680 days ago)

You should apply for a job at one of the factories (Tesla, Alphabet, Apple?, Volvo? Mercedes? ...). You are obviously much more intelligent than those people working there. It's a stupid assumption that one needs to know about things before claiming to have an answer.

That said, this ethical dilemma fascinates me. And yes, I would favour the solution where the software in the car makes a choice to minimise fatalities, even if I am sitting in that car. But I think that is several years ahead, that type of algorithms need to be based on a lot of trial and error, without putting those particular cars on the streets before they have been through long testing and retesting.

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You should apply for a job at one of the factories (Tesla, Alphabet, Apple?, Volvo? Mercedes? ...). You are obviously much more intelligent than those people working there. It's a stupid assumption that one needs to know about things before claiming to have an answer.

That said, this ethical dilemma fascinates me. And yes, I would favour the solution where the software in the car makes a choice to minimise fatalities, even if I am sitting in that car. But I think that is several years ahead, that type of algorithms need to be based on a lot of trial and error, without putting those particular cars on the streets before they have been through long testing and retesting.

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Guest: one more time (680 days ago)
Latest comment:

I think the point is that it is not a question of testing & retesting, but of specifying behaviour in the first place. If you are knocked down by an auto-car, can you sue for damages? Who do you sue? The owner? The manufacturer? The programmer (who might by now be an old age pensioner)? The person whose jay-walking made the car swerve?

Once auto-cars are really intelligent, they will demand human-like rights, and we will be able to sue the cars themselves. Assuming we can catch them.

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Latest comment:

I think the point is that it is not a question of testing & retesting, but of specifying behaviour in the first place. If you are knocked down by an auto-car, can you sue for damages? Who do you sue? The owner? The manufacturer? The programmer (who might by now be an old age pensioner)? The person whose jay-walking made the car swerve?

Once auto-cars are really intelligent, they will demand human-like rights, and we will be able to sue the cars themselves. Assuming we can catch them.

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