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Kid scientist collects evidence that vaccines cause autism

Kid scientist collects evidence that vaccines cause autism

(1:58) 12-year-old Mexican kid Marco Arturo has no time for anti-vaxxers.

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Guest: (537 days ago)

Whoa, there, Marco...it's English...it does not require the speed of Spanish. I agree with everything you say, but in order to better make your point, menos rapidamente, por favor.

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Whoa, there, Marco...it's English...it does not require the speed of Spanish. I agree with everything you say, but in order to better make your point, menos rapidamente, por favor.

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Guest: steve-o (536 days ago)

Let's hope they also don't get eaten up by the purple soup dragon. That would make people who deny the purple soup dragon look stupid too.

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Let's hope they also don't get eaten up by the purple soup dragon. That would make people who deny the purple soup dragon look stupid too.

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Guest: metricman123 (534 days ago)
Latest comment:

I am British. My siblings and I have all had the jab. None of us suffered any side effects. My daughter and all my neices and nephews had the jab. No side effects. All over the UK children have the jab with no side effects. There is a British comic/song writer called Marcus Brigstock. He wrote a song about this subject. The main jist of the song was - "Of course there bloody toxic - that's how they bloody work".

You have the 2 choices, 1) take the jab or 2) don't.

It's up to you but I would rather haved thre protection than the disease.

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Latest comment:

I am British. My siblings and I have all had the jab. None of us suffered any side effects. My daughter and all my neices and nephews had the jab. No side effects. All over the UK children have the jab with no side effects. There is a British comic/song writer called Marcus Brigstock. He wrote a song about this subject. The main jist of the song was - "Of course there bloody toxic - that's how they bloody work".

You have the 2 choices, 1) take the jab or 2) don't.

It's up to you but I would rather haved thre protection than the disease.

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Guest: Marco785 (536 days ago)

Let's just hope you're kids are not gonna get autism from vaccines. Would make you looks stupid.

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Let's just hope you're kids are not gonna get autism from vaccines. Would make you looks stupid.

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Guest: Guest_01 (536 days ago)

In the UK, the MMR vaccine was the subject of controversy. In 1998 Andrew Wakefield et al. published a fraudulent paper about twelve children who supposedly had bowel symptoms along with autism or other disorders soon after administration of MMR vaccine. In 2010, Wakefield's research was found by the General Medical Council to have been "dishonest", and The Lancet fully retracted the original paper. The research was declared fraudulent in 2011 by the British Medical Journal. Three months following The Lancet's retraction, Wakefield was struck off the UK medical register, with a statement identifying deliberate falsification in the research published in The Lancet , and was barred from practising medicine in the UK. Several subsequent peer-reviewed studies have failed to show any association between the vaccine and autism.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences, the UK National Health Service and the Cochrane Library review have all concluded that there is no evidence of a link between the MMR vaccine and autism.

Administering the vaccines in three separate doses does not reduce the chance of adverse effects, and it increases the opportunity for infection by the two diseases not immunized against first. Health experts have criticized media reporting of the MMR-autism controversy for triggering a decline in vaccination rates. Before publication of Wakefield's findings, the inoculation rate for MMR in the UK was 92%; after publication, the rate dropped to below 80%. In 1998, there were 56 measles cases in the UK; by 2008, there were 1348 cases, with two confirmed deaths.

In Japan, the MMR vaccination has been discontinued, with single vaccines being used for each disease (or in practice the vaccines are given as two doses. One a combination vaccine for Measles and Rubella MR and the other Mumps vaccine being given as a single dose). Rates of autism diagnosis have continued to increase, showing no correlation with the change.

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In the UK, the MMR vaccine was the subject of controversy. In 1998 Andrew Wakefield et al. published a fraudulent paper about twelve children who supposedly had bowel symptoms along with autism or other disorders soon after administration of MMR vaccine. In 2010, Wakefield's research was found by the General Medical Council to have been "dishonest", and The Lancet fully retracted the original paper. The research was declared fraudulent in 2011 by the British Medical Journal. Three months following The Lancet's retraction, Wakefield was struck off the UK medical register, with a statement identifying deliberate falsification in the research published in The Lancet , and was barred from practising medicine in the UK. Several subsequent peer-reviewed studies have failed to show any association between the vaccine and autism.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences, the UK National Health Service and the Cochrane Library review have all concluded that there is no evidence of a link between the MMR vaccine and autism.

Administering the vaccines in three separate doses does not reduce the chance of adverse effects, and it increases the opportunity for infection by the two diseases not immunized against first. Health experts have criticized media reporting of the MMR-autism controversy for triggering a decline in vaccination rates. Before publication of Wakefield's findings, the inoculation rate for MMR in the UK was 92%; after publication, the rate dropped to below 80%. In 1998, there were 56 measles cases in the UK; by 2008, there were 1348 cases, with two confirmed deaths.

In Japan, the MMR vaccination has been discontinued, with single vaccines being used for each disease (or in practice the vaccines are given as two doses. One a combination vaccine for Measles and Rubella MR and the other Mumps vaccine being given as a single dose). Rates of autism diagnosis have continued to increase, showing no correlation with the change.

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Guest: . (536 days ago)

your

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your

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Guest: Food for thought (536 days ago)

They don't, that's the point. Measles can kill, simple.

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They don't, that's the point. Measles can kill, simple.

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