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Which EU laws are you looking forward to losing?

Which EU laws are you looking forward to losing?

(7:01) LBC presenter James O'Brien and a committed Brexiter discuss the reasons for voting to leave the EU.

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Guest: (49 days ago)

Welcome back Pete!

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Welcome back Pete!

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Guest: (50 days ago)

Celebs using super injunctions to mask their hypocrisy is my favourite

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Celebs using super injunctions to mask their hypocrisy is my favourite

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WalterEgo WalterEgo (49 days ago)

What do you even mean? Is your comment on the wrong video?

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What do you even mean? Is your comment on the wrong video?

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Guest: (49 days ago)

I suppose it's way to complicated to explain how super injunctions evolved from a EU directive

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I suppose it's way to complicated to explain how super injunctions evolved from a EU directive

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WalterEgo WalterEgo (49 days ago)

Then why mention it.

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Then why mention it.

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Guest: (49 days ago)

Oh I read a treatise on the subject a couple of days ago, but I can't find it now, it was quite interesting, particularly the usage by companies to protect their future earnings.

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Oh I read a treatise on the subject a couple of days ago, but I can't find it now, it was quite interesting, particularly the usage by companies to protect their future earnings.

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Guest: (48 days ago)

This HAS to be a comment from The Original MAD. Who else would be mysteriously unable to name his sources!

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This HAS to be a comment from The Original MAD. Who else would be mysteriously unable to name his sources!

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Guest: (48 days ago)

Actually the reason I can't find it is because it has gotten buried.it will turn up somewhere

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Actually the reason I can't find it is because it has gotten buried.it will turn up somewhere

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Guest: (47 days ago)

Oh RIGHT, of course, I see.

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Oh RIGHT, of course, I see.

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Guest: (47 days ago)

Printout. Not everything is on the web

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Printout. Not everything is on the web

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Guest: (47 days ago)

A printout from what?

My guess it that it'll be in a stack of documents with the satellite climate data you looked at, all those liberal articles against Obama, that horticulture book that describes money trees as monkey puzzle trees, all those old books with your expression about right wingers, your physics doctorate, and probably hundreds of thousands of Valentine's cards.

Right?

Original comment

A printout from what?

My guess it that it'll be in a stack of documents with the satellite climate data you looked at, all those liberal articles against Obama, that horticulture book that describes money trees as monkey puzzle trees, all those old books with your expression about right wingers, your physics doctorate, and probably hundreds of thousands of Valentine's cards.

Right?

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Guest: (47 days ago)

Well the satellite data sets I guess are easily viewable at the relevant agency that compiles them, whereas this treatise is most definitely offline.

However the story of trifigura is well known

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Well the satellite data sets I guess are easily viewable at the relevant agency that compiles them, whereas this treatise is most definitely offline.

However the story of trifigura is well known

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Guest: (46 days ago)

So well known you can't even remember its name correctly

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So well known you can't even remember its name correctly

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Guest: (46 days ago)

Predictive text is a bigger sometimes

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Predictive text is a bigger sometimes

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Guest: (46 days ago)

Your predictive text dictionary has the non-existent word 'trifigura' in it? How unusual.

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Your predictive text dictionary has the non-existent word 'trifigura' in it? How unusual.

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Guest: (45 days ago)

It does if you've typed the word before

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It does if you've typed the word before

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Guest: (43 days ago)

And you've typed the word 'trifigura' before? Why would that be?

(Anti-bullying clause: If you want, you can have a think and change your excuse.)

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And you've typed the word 'trifigura' before? Why would that be?

(Anti-bullying clause: If you want, you can have a think and change your excuse.)

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Guest: (43 days ago)

Because spellchecks and predictive text tend to have a memory function. It remembers words spelt out for example like trifigura, or Nigel, claire etc.

Have you really never come across this ?

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Because spellchecks and predictive text tend to have a memory function. It remembers words spelt out for example like trifigura, or Nigel, claire etc.

Have you really never come across this ?

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Guest: (43 days ago)

Oh and if you are reading a paper document you are allowed to use the interweb to check for example newspaper articles written at the time.

Have you seriously never cross referenced ?

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Oh and if you are reading a paper document you are allowed to use the interweb to check for example newspaper articles written at the time.

Have you seriously never cross referenced ?

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Guest: (47 days ago)

After Brexit, which EU law will you miss?
Excluding free movement, common market etc.

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After Brexit, which EU law will you miss?
Excluding free movement, common market etc.

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Guest: (43 days ago)

I'm concerned about what will happen to human rights in the UK, to health & safety, to environmental protection, to support for education and research, to the development of international standards, to roaming charges, to the inevitable increase in bureaucracy on all fronts ... do you want any more?

But excluding free movement, common market etc is excluding the main ones. The freedom to live & work anywhere in Europe is a biggie for me. To be able to say "Sod it, I'm off!" and just pack and go to a new life, is wonderfully liberating. Even if you never do it, just knowing that you can, is a boost. I pity those who never look beyond their immediate horizons: they miss out on so much.

Original comment

I'm concerned about what will happen to human rights in the UK, to health & safety, to environmental protection, to support for education and research, to the development of international standards, to roaming charges, to the inevitable increase in bureaucracy on all fronts ... do you want any more?

But excluding free movement, common market etc is excluding the main ones. The freedom to live & work anywhere in Europe is a biggie for me. To be able to say "Sod it, I'm off!" and just pack and go to a new life, is wonderfully liberating. Even if you never do it, just knowing that you can, is a boost. I pity those who never look beyond their immediate horizons: they miss out on so much.

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Guest: Goodbye (43 days ago)

Nothing is stopping you emigrating if you so wish.

PS habeas corpus is an peculiar concept unique to English based law systems. You might find your freedom of speech curtailed more in Europe, particularly when they let Turkey join.

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Nothing is stopping you emigrating if you so wish.

PS habeas corpus is an peculiar concept unique to English based law systems. You might find your freedom of speech curtailed more in Europe, particularly when they let Turkey join.

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Guest: (43 days ago)

Why are you suggesting that I emigrate? Are you really saying I can just **** off if I don't agree with your politics? Because that attitude works both ways. If you don't like Europe, you too could "emigrate."

This is my country, and I want it to be a great place to live.

What has habeas corpus got to do with which EU laws I look forward to losing?

Original comment

Why are you suggesting that I emigrate? Are you really saying I can just **** off if I don't agree with your politics? Because that attitude works both ways. If you don't like Europe, you too could "emigrate."

This is my country, and I want it to be a great place to live.

What has habeas corpus got to do with which EU laws I look forward to losing?

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Guest: Goodbye (43 days ago)

Anyone would think that human rights, foreign travel, and working abroad were EU inventions. If you think they were, then seriously, what's keeping you from moving there and availing yourself of their benefits.

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Anyone would think that human rights, foreign travel, and working abroad were EU inventions. If you think they were, then seriously, what's keeping you from moving there and availing yourself of their benefits.

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Guest: (43 days ago)

They are not EU inventions, but they are easily accessible rights of EU citizens. I don't need to move "there" as they are available right here in the UK so long as it's a member of the EU. And I did work abroad for several years. It was a good time which I enjoyed.

Do you think that human rights, foreign travel, and working abroad are British inventions?

Original comment

They are not EU inventions, but they are easily accessible rights of EU citizens. I don't need to move "there" as they are available right here in the UK so long as it's a member of the EU. And I did work abroad for several years. It was a good time which I enjoyed.

Do you think that human rights, foreign travel, and working abroad are British inventions?

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Guest: Goodbye (43 days ago)

Britain and British law as a long history of being in the vanguard of human rights. Habeas corpus for example. Europe on the other hand........,and EU law does have alarming wrinkles in it.. best to be under British law which isn't subject to the whims of ideology

Original comment

Britain and British law as a long history of being in the vanguard of human rights. Habeas corpus for example. Europe on the other hand........,and EU law does have alarming wrinkles in it.. best to be under British law which isn't subject to the whims of ideology

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Guest: (43 days ago)

Conservatard alert.

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Conservatard alert.

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Guest: (43 days ago)

Conservatard alert.

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Conservatard alert.

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Guest: Goodbye (43 days ago)

I love chatting to idiot liberals. They really think that calling me names is really going to alter the historical origin of habeas corpus in English law.

Typical libtard response to being given facts I must say.

Original comment

I love chatting to idiot liberals. They really think that calling me names is really going to alter the historical origin of habeas corpus in English law.

Typical libtard response to being given facts I must say.

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Guest: Goodbye (43 days ago)

I mean it's not like everybody with a decent british education isn't aware of the habeas corpus origin. Americans know about it too as it's an very important concept in American law as well.

It does make me wonder about some people. Lacking in background knowledge sure makes you susceptible to being fed a distorted view of the world, like thinking that only by being in the EU do you get human rights.

Absurd of course, but also quite sad.

Original comment

I mean it's not like everybody with a decent british education isn't aware of the habeas corpus origin. Americans know about it too as it's an very important concept in American law as well.

It does make me wonder about some people. Lacking in background knowledge sure makes you susceptible to being fed a distorted view of the world, like thinking that only by being in the EU do you get human rights.

Absurd of course, but also quite sad.

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Guest: (43 days ago)

The UK was a key player in setting up the human rights system in the EU. The UK now plans to tear that up and invent its own "Bill of Rights" because the EU system confers too many human rights. The UK wants to be able to imprison and deport more people with less control.

That is why I am concerned about human rights in the UK if the UK leaves the EU. The UK is moving in a direction I do not like.

Of course, the UK will only want to imprison and deport "bad people" like "terrorists" but governments and law enforcement agencies have a history of using laws for purposes quite different to those the laws were introduced for in the first place. Google "misuse of anti terror laws" for examples.

Original comment

The UK was a key player in setting up the human rights system in the EU. The UK now plans to tear that up and invent its own "Bill of Rights" because the EU system confers too many human rights. The UK wants to be able to imprison and deport more people with less control.

That is why I am concerned about human rights in the UK if the UK leaves the EU. The UK is moving in a direction I do not like.

Of course, the UK will only want to imprison and deport "bad people" like "terrorists" but governments and law enforcement agencies have a history of using laws for purposes quite different to those the laws were introduced for in the first place. Google "misuse of anti terror laws" for examples.

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Guest: Goodbye (42 days ago)

Isn't it great that we are getting rid of a bad law that has lead to so many perversions of justice. The common sense bill of rights will address the rights of the public particularly the rights of the victims familes to see that justice is being done, and end the get out of jail free culture that has arisen under a libtard rule.

Original comment

Isn't it great that we are getting rid of a bad law that has lead to so many perversions of justice. The common sense bill of rights will address the rights of the public particularly the rights of the victims familes to see that justice is being done, and end the get out of jail free culture that has arisen under a libtard rule.

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Guest: (42 days ago)

But the "bad law" was mostly a UK invention, so it must be good, right? Is it possible the UK invented something bad? Oh, but we've learned from our mistakes, and the BoR will be wonderful. Bigly wonderful.

It's easy to defend a law that punishes people you disagree with and protects those you agree with. Any despot can do that.

Original comment

But the "bad law" was mostly a UK invention, so it must be good, right? Is it possible the UK invented something bad? Oh, but we've learned from our mistakes, and the BoR will be wonderful. Bigly wonderful.

It's easy to defend a law that punishes people you disagree with and protects those you agree with. Any despot can do that.

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Guest: Goodbye (42 days ago)

It was a law invented to comply with an EU directive. Scrapping it and replacing it with a law designed to preserve the good intent with a healtthy dose of practical common sense to prevent the perverse usage to evade justice is a good thing is it not

Original comment

It was a law invented to comply with an EU directive. Scrapping it and replacing it with a law designed to preserve the good intent with a healtthy dose of practical common sense to prevent the perverse usage to evade justice is a good thing is it not

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Guest: (42 days ago)

What?! It dates back to 1950, rather before the EU existed in anything like its present form. "the convention, drawing on the inspiration of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights can be seen as part of a wider response of the Allied Powers in delivering a human rights agenda through which it was believed that the most serious human rights violations which had occurred during the Second World War could be avoided in the future." - wikipedia

Specifically, Which of the articles would you like to lose? The ones on torture? Slavery? Fair trial? Discriination? Please do say.

Also, I'd love to see some examples of the "perverse usage to evade justice." See if they are listed in the LINK website.

Google "european human rights history" for some background.

Original comment

What?! It dates back to 1950, rather before the EU existed in anything like its present form. "the convention, drawing on the inspiration of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights can be seen as part of a wider response of the Allied Powers in delivering a human rights agenda through which it was believed that the most serious human rights violations which had occurred during the Second World War could be avoided in the future." - wikipedia

Specifically, Which of the articles would you like to lose? The ones on torture? Slavery? Fair trial? Discriination? Please do say.

Also, I'd love to see some examples of the "perverse usage to evade justice." See if they are listed in the LINK website.

Google "european human rights history" for some background.

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Guest: Goodbye (42 days ago)

I think you will find it was not binding under EU law until 2009, you are quoting a UN declaration which isn't universal.

You also need to look up the Cairo declaration of 1990 which makes a mockery of the whole procedure, by declaring non Muslims to be sub humans ( Subservient under the law ) using the same UN declaration.

Sorry for showing you up as having only a limited grasp of reality again.

Original comment

I think you will find it was not binding under EU law until 2009, you are quoting a UN declaration which isn't universal.

You also need to look up the Cairo declaration of 1990 which makes a mockery of the whole procedure, by declaring non Muslims to be sub humans ( Subservient under the law ) using the same UN declaration.

Sorry for showing you up as having only a limited grasp of reality again.

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Guest: (42 days ago)

Don't be sorry - I'm willing to learn. Any references?

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Don't be sorry - I'm willing to learn. Any references?

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Guest: (42 days ago)

I did look up the Cairo declaration. According to wikipedia (not the most reliable source, but anyway):

This declaration is widely acknowledged as an Islamic response to the United Nations's Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR), adopted in 1948. It guarantees many of the same rights as the UDHR, while at the same time reaffirming the inequalities inherent in Islamic law and tradition in terms of religion, religious conversion, gender, sexuality, political rights, and other aspects of contemporary society at odds with various interpretations of the Islamic law and traditions.

The CDHRI was adopted in 1990 by members of the Organisation of the Islamic Conference. It has been signed by 45 states so far.[5] In 1992, the CDHRI was presented to the United Nations Commission on Human Rights, where it was strongly condemned by the International Commission of Jurists .

[Adama Dieng] argued that the declaration gravely threatens the inter-cultural consensus on which the international human rights instruments are based; that it introduces intolerable discrimination against non-Muslims and women.

[my emphasis added] In short, it is a travesty, just as you say. But it has nothing whatever to do with the EU (or UN) human rights.

Original comment

I did look up the Cairo declaration. According to wikipedia (not the most reliable source, but anyway):

This declaration is widely acknowledged as an Islamic response to the United Nations's Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR), adopted in 1948. It guarantees many of the same rights as the UDHR, while at the same time reaffirming the inequalities inherent in Islamic law and tradition in terms of religion, religious conversion, gender, sexuality, political rights, and other aspects of contemporary society at odds with various interpretations of the Islamic law and traditions.

The CDHRI was adopted in 1990 by members of the Organisation of the Islamic Conference. It has been signed by 45 states so far.[5] In 1992, the CDHRI was presented to the United Nations Commission on Human Rights, where it was strongly condemned by the International Commission of Jurists .

[Adama Dieng] argued that the declaration gravely threatens the inter-cultural consensus on which the international human rights instruments are based; that it introduces intolerable discrimination against non-Muslims and women.

[my emphasis added] In short, it is a travesty, just as you say. But it has nothing whatever to do with the EU (or UN) human rights.

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Guest: Goodbye (42 days ago)

Well at least we have found common ground. The problem is with so many of the European politicians owned by Saudis it's only a matter of time before Muslims get treated as a special case and accorded superiority over the rest, in fact it's already happening with respect to hate speech.

Original comment

Well at least we have found common ground. The problem is with so many of the European politicians owned by Saudis it's only a matter of time before Muslims get treated as a special case and accorded superiority over the rest, in fact it's already happening with respect to hate speech.

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Guest: (42 days ago)

What makes you confident it won't happen to the Bill of Rights in the UK?

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What makes you confident it won't happen to the Bill of Rights in the UK?

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Guest: Goodbye (42 days ago)

Politicians in this country can be voted out individually, unlike in europe

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Politicians in this country can be voted out individually, unlike in europe

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Guest: Heidihox (40 days ago)
Latest comment: fashion institute of technology admissions essay LINK
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Latest comment: fashion institute of technology admissions essay LINK
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