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Jimmy Dore takes a look at Labour's manisfesto

Jimmy Dore takes a look at Labour's manisfesto

(21:21) Jimmy Dore runs through Labour's leaked manifesto and finds Jeremy Corbyn makes Bernie Sanders look like a centrist.

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COncernedCitizen COncernedCitizen (71 days ago)

Who needs to put 20% down when buying a house? Maybe if you're buying a house for more than it's appraised value but you shouldn't do that anyway.

Not all jobs qualify for overtime pay. The CEO of a Fortune 500 company, for example, doesn’t get overtime pay. Not all jobs require that you clock in and out and they are usually professional jobs. Those are called exempt employees.

Zero hour contracts are important for some jobs. A limo driver can have a contract like that. Depending on the season, they may not have any work for that driver. Many limo drivers are part-time workers so they have another job elsewhere and drive the limo for extra money. I’ve never given anyone zero hours but for disciplinary action, I have reduced employees hours while increasing other employees hours who have better performance. Sometimes reducing the hours below a point causes the employee to quit which makes it easier than having to fire someone. It’s an at-will employment so it’s easy to fire someone but then you don’t have to watch them cry.

Regarding gig employees, does that mean Uber drivers will now become official employees of the Uber company so Uber will then have to pay medicare and social security taxes for them?

Original comment

Who needs to put 20% down when buying a house? Maybe if you're buying a house for more than it's appraised value but you shouldn't do that anyway.

Not all jobs qualify for overtime pay. The CEO of a Fortune 500 company, for example, doesn’t get overtime pay. Not all jobs require that you clock in and out and they are usually professional jobs. Those are called exempt employees.

Zero hour contracts are important for some jobs. A limo driver can have a contract like that. Depending on the season, they may not have any work for that driver. Many limo drivers are part-time workers so they have another job elsewhere and drive the limo for extra money. I’ve never given anyone zero hours but for disciplinary action, I have reduced employees hours while increasing other employees hours who have better performance. Sometimes reducing the hours below a point causes the employee to quit which makes it easier than having to fire someone. It’s an at-will employment so it’s easy to fire someone but then you don’t have to watch them cry.

Regarding gig employees, does that mean Uber drivers will now become official employees of the Uber company so Uber will then have to pay medicare and social security taxes for them?

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TheBob TheBob (70 days ago)

"so it’s easy to fire someone but then you don’t have to watch them cry." I do hope you're attempting irony here.

"Regarding gig employees, does that mean Uber drivers will now become official employees of the Uber company so Uber will then have to pay medicare and social security taxes for them?"

Yes - and why not? If you want a loyal workforce, willing to go the extra mile, then it's a 2-way street. You look after them (sick pay, holidays) and they'll look after you (overtime, loyalty to the company).

If you screw every last penny out of them, they will constantly be looking to find a better job. At the very least your recruitment costs go up but you'll also have a transient workforce who don't care about your customers or the public profile of your company.

(But I guess it saves having to fire them and watch them cry)

Original comment

"so it’s easy to fire someone but then you don’t have to watch them cry." I do hope you're attempting irony here.

"Regarding gig employees, does that mean Uber drivers will now become official employees of the Uber company so Uber will then have to pay medicare and social security taxes for them?"

Yes - and why not? If you want a loyal workforce, willing to go the extra mile, then it's a 2-way street. You look after them (sick pay, holidays) and they'll look after you (overtime, loyalty to the company).

If you screw every last penny out of them, they will constantly be looking to find a better job. At the very least your recruitment costs go up but you'll also have a transient workforce who don't care about your customers or the public profile of your company.

(But I guess it saves having to fire them and watch them cry)

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COncernedCitizen COncernedCitizen (70 days ago)

I'm sure most Uber drivers do it to supplement their income instead of having that as their only source of revenue. Should they become corporate employees, then they should also be provided with corporate tools to do the job such as a car. That's not going to happen.

If I sell something on eBay and I pay eBay a commission for selling my product on their site, then the eBay company becomes my employer and I have to pay taxes for them now? See how crazy this philosphy can get?

"If you screw every last penny out of them, they will constantly be looking to find a better job." Okay, so let them find another job. If Uber is not paying enough to compensate for their time and other expenses then people will stop driving and cab drivers will get their fares back again. But we all know that's not going to happen soon.

"I do hope you're attempting irony here" . Not really. I've had to fire people and it's not a pleasant thing to have to go through as the employer or the employee. I doubt too many people get enjoyment out of having to fire someone but it's necessary sometimes when reducing seasonal workforce or underperforming associates.

Original comment

I'm sure most Uber drivers do it to supplement their income instead of having that as their only source of revenue. Should they become corporate employees, then they should also be provided with corporate tools to do the job such as a car. That's not going to happen.

If I sell something on eBay and I pay eBay a commission for selling my product on their site, then the eBay company becomes my employer and I have to pay taxes for them now? See how crazy this philosphy can get?

"If you screw every last penny out of them, they will constantly be looking to find a better job." Okay, so let them find another job. If Uber is not paying enough to compensate for their time and other expenses then people will stop driving and cab drivers will get their fares back again. But we all know that's not going to happen soon.

"I do hope you're attempting irony here" . Not really. I've had to fire people and it's not a pleasant thing to have to go through as the employer or the employee. I doubt too many people get enjoyment out of having to fire someone but it's necessary sometimes when reducing seasonal workforce or underperforming associates.

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TheBob TheBob (70 days ago)

"I do hope you're attempting irony here" You're dealing with people's lives. Seasonal employment should be predicted and a fixed term contract offered. You should know when the fruit is going to be on the trees and if the fruit lasts longer than the contract, offer the fruit-pickers a 1 or 2 week extension.

Underperforming associates should have gone through appraisals and performance assessments. They should have had help to get up to speed, written warnings, disciplinaries if they're not fulfilling their duties. Dismissal should not be a surprise - and if how you fire people makes them cry, I'd say it's a sign of a bad manager.

Original comment

"I do hope you're attempting irony here" You're dealing with people's lives. Seasonal employment should be predicted and a fixed term contract offered. You should know when the fruit is going to be on the trees and if the fruit lasts longer than the contract, offer the fruit-pickers a 1 or 2 week extension.

Underperforming associates should have gone through appraisals and performance assessments. They should have had help to get up to speed, written warnings, disciplinaries if they're not fulfilling their duties. Dismissal should not be a surprise - and if how you fire people makes them cry, I'd say it's a sign of a bad manager.

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COncernedCitizen COncernedCitizen (70 days ago)
Latest comment:

"fixed term contract offered. " We don't usually offer contracts here beause it's only beneficial for one of the parties. For example, if you invest in a lot of training for yor employees and a contract requires that they work for you for a year after you hire them to make sure the costs of training is fully utilized, they could find a better job somewhere else but are stuck in your lower paying job for that year (beneficial to the employer). If you hire someone and give them a contract and then they cannot do the job, then the employee has the right to stay and you continue to pay them but still have to hire someone else to do the job they are incapable of doing (beneficial to the employee).

Jobs by default are at-will employment meaning the employer can terminate you at any time for no reason and the employee is able to leave at any time for no reason. There may be some exceptions with some jobs but an employment agreement would state the terms such as garden leaves.

Seasonal jobs are obvious. For example, retail stores usually staff up for the Christmas holiday. Then, in early January staff is let go. No matter how often you tell them that their job is temporary, they still get emotional when you tell them it's time to leave. Maybe you're one of the 1% that never had to be fired so you don't know the emotional rollercoaster you go on so you don't understand why people cry during that event. It's not about being a bad manager.

Your example of fruit pickers was a good one. They do not offer contracts for those people. Many try that job and fail. If you get a chance, you should see the entire documentary about H2a visas for those jobs and why we hire Mexicans and very few Americans. Here's a small 3 minute sampler: LINK Nothing would be worse as an employer to give someone a long-term contract for that job and find out they are one of the many that cannot handle the job. Notice in the video, Morgan actually earns $2.85 an hour for 10 hours beause he didn't fill many buckets. But the law is clear that you must have at least minimum wage. So now the employer must pay a higher wage than what he actually should have earned so those oranges that he picked will cost more than the ones picked by the Mexicans. He would be one of those people terminated.

"Dismissal should not be a surprise" It isn't a surprise but that doesn't stop some people from getting emotional about it.

I have worked for companies where we terminate you immediately if you gave a two-week notice that you were planning on leaving the company. There are many reasons for that but I'll only mention a couple. The employee can cause sabotage or take sensitive information with them to their new company. Once notice is given, their access is terminated immediately to prevent those. It is still considered a voluntary quit so they do not qualify for unemployment benefits or severance pay.

Original comment
Latest comment:

"fixed term contract offered. " We don't usually offer contracts here beause it's only beneficial for one of the parties. For example, if you invest in a lot of training for yor employees and a contract requires that they work for you for a year after you hire them to make sure the costs of training is fully utilized, they could find a better job somewhere else but are stuck in your lower paying job for that year (beneficial to the employer). If you hire someone and give them a contract and then they cannot do the job, then the employee has the right to stay and you continue to pay them but still have to hire someone else to do the job they are incapable of doing (beneficial to the employee).

Jobs by default are at-will employment meaning the employer can terminate you at any time for no reason and the employee is able to leave at any time for no reason. There may be some exceptions with some jobs but an employment agreement would state the terms such as garden leaves.

Seasonal jobs are obvious. For example, retail stores usually staff up for the Christmas holiday. Then, in early January staff is let go. No matter how often you tell them that their job is temporary, they still get emotional when you tell them it's time to leave. Maybe you're one of the 1% that never had to be fired so you don't know the emotional rollercoaster you go on so you don't understand why people cry during that event. It's not about being a bad manager.

Your example of fruit pickers was a good one. They do not offer contracts for those people. Many try that job and fail. If you get a chance, you should see the entire documentary about H2a visas for those jobs and why we hire Mexicans and very few Americans. Here's a small 3 minute sampler: LINK Nothing would be worse as an employer to give someone a long-term contract for that job and find out they are one of the many that cannot handle the job. Notice in the video, Morgan actually earns $2.85 an hour for 10 hours beause he didn't fill many buckets. But the law is clear that you must have at least minimum wage. So now the employer must pay a higher wage than what he actually should have earned so those oranges that he picked will cost more than the ones picked by the Mexicans. He would be one of those people terminated.

"Dismissal should not be a surprise" It isn't a surprise but that doesn't stop some people from getting emotional about it.

I have worked for companies where we terminate you immediately if you gave a two-week notice that you were planning on leaving the company. There are many reasons for that but I'll only mention a couple. The employee can cause sabotage or take sensitive information with them to their new company. Once notice is given, their access is terminated immediately to prevent those. It is still considered a voluntary quit so they do not qualify for unemployment benefits or severance pay.

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bamber bamber (71 days ago)

In UK terms practically any US politician is to the right of centre.

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In UK terms practically any US politician is to the right of centre.

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