FOLLOW BOREME
TAGS
<< Back to listing
Tony Blair: It's absolutely necessary that Brexit doesn't happen

Tony Blair: It's absolutely necessary that Brexit doesn't happen

(0:47) Former PM Tony Blair on why it's necessary to prevent Brexit from happening. 15 July, 2017. Full Sky interview: youtu.be/IJYfT2fwTlI

Share this post

You can comment as a guest, but registering gives you added benefits

Add your comment
Submit as guest (your name)

Copy code captcha


Submit as member (username / password)

CANCEL
WalterEgo WalterEgo (10 days ago)

Being wrong on Iraq doesn't mean you're wrong on everything. I think Blair is also wrong on God, and Labour's "Third Way", but on Brexit, he's spot on. And what's really frustrating is that it's all our own doing.

The EU didn't force austerity on us. The EU didn't force us to sell off our council houses and not replace them. The EU didn't force us to run down our NHS and not train enough doctors or nurses. The EU didn't force us to privatise our railways. All of these "mistakes" - we made of our own volition.

AND ... the EU didn't force us to have an open door policy for EU citizens. I only recently found out that we can control EU immigration within "movement of labour". Of the 4 EU freedoms, it's movement of labour, not people. These are the rules in Belgium: LINK And I believe they are similar in other EU countries. Basically, after 90 days, you cannot stay unless you are employed, a student or trainee, or a family member of a Belgian citizen. I don't think this happens in the UK. Why is no one suggesting we could just apply these same rules? Immigration problem solved, no reason to continue with this disastrous Brexit. Am I missing something?

Original comment

Being wrong on Iraq doesn't mean you're wrong on everything. I think Blair is also wrong on God, and Labour's "Third Way", but on Brexit, he's spot on. And what's really frustrating is that it's all our own doing.

The EU didn't force austerity on us. The EU didn't force us to sell off our council houses and not replace them. The EU didn't force us to run down our NHS and not train enough doctors or nurses. The EU didn't force us to privatise our railways. All of these "mistakes" - we made of our own volition.

AND ... the EU didn't force us to have an open door policy for EU citizens. I only recently found out that we can control EU immigration within "movement of labour". Of the 4 EU freedoms, it's movement of labour, not people. These are the rules in Belgium: LINK And I believe they are similar in other EU countries. Basically, after 90 days, you cannot stay unless you are employed, a student or trainee, or a family member of a Belgian citizen. I don't think this happens in the UK. Why is no one suggesting we could just apply these same rules? Immigration problem solved, no reason to continue with this disastrous Brexit. Am I missing something?

Add your reply
Submit as guest (your name)

Copy code captcha


Submit as member (username / password)

CANCEL
Guest: (10 days ago)

The problem is that you're expecting anyone with a vote to be able to make conscientious forward-thinking political decisions where the complex consequences aren't clear. This, in a climate where we've had our leaders telling us things that were simply untrue, appealing to our fears and prejudice. If you're not political, but you're fed up of foreigners (for example), then when your leaders tell you they can sort it by leaving the EU, of course that is going to appeal. And whose fault is that? What do you expect of us? A referendum turns a political issue into one of marketing.

Personally, I think it's important that we through with it and see what the fuss was all about. There has been outright denial from Brexiteers since the start of their campaign, and it's getting more and more difficult for them to justify what is already happening. The public will have to learn a lesson from this.

Original comment

The problem is that you're expecting anyone with a vote to be able to make conscientious forward-thinking political decisions where the complex consequences aren't clear. This, in a climate where we've had our leaders telling us things that were simply untrue, appealing to our fears and prejudice. If you're not political, but you're fed up of foreigners (for example), then when your leaders tell you they can sort it by leaving the EU, of course that is going to appeal. And whose fault is that? What do you expect of us? A referendum turns a political issue into one of marketing.

Personally, I think it's important that we through with it and see what the fuss was all about. There has been outright denial from Brexiteers since the start of their campaign, and it's getting more and more difficult for them to justify what is already happening. The public will have to learn a lesson from this.

Add your reply
Submit as guest (your name)

Copy code captcha


Submit as member (username / password)

CANCEL
TheBob TheBob (9 days ago)

I agree with most of your comment: we were force-fed half-truths and spin. Arguments against Brexit were dismissed as "Project Fear" and the Leavers stoked Jingoism and xenophobia until they squeaked through with a narrow majority. They are now peddling the lie that it's "the will of the people."

However, I disagree with your comment, "I think it's important that we through with it and see what the fuss was all about." You shouldn't put your hand in the mincer just to find out how dangerous and damaging it is to grind your fingers off.

If you disagree with the result you have an absolute right to continue to campaign in order to prevent something bad happening - when the opposition loses an election it doesn't go home and sit on its hands for 5 years.

And you can bet your bottom dollar that if the result had been 48% to 52% the other way, Nigel Farage and his ilk would not have packed up their tents and gone home. They'd have been banging on about the tragedy of half the electorate having their legitimate hopes and expectations being ignored - and arguing for some kind of compromise solution.

As a remainer, I think that's what we should be doing and (like Walter) while I disagree with Blair on many issues, on this occasion I think he's right.

It's just a bit disappointing that the only people who seem to be representing my views at the moment are Tony Blair and Vince Cable.

Original comment

I agree with most of your comment: we were force-fed half-truths and spin. Arguments against Brexit were dismissed as "Project Fear" and the Leavers stoked Jingoism and xenophobia until they squeaked through with a narrow majority. They are now peddling the lie that it's "the will of the people."

However, I disagree with your comment, "I think it's important that we through with it and see what the fuss was all about." You shouldn't put your hand in the mincer just to find out how dangerous and damaging it is to grind your fingers off.

If you disagree with the result you have an absolute right to continue to campaign in order to prevent something bad happening - when the opposition loses an election it doesn't go home and sit on its hands for 5 years.

And you can bet your bottom dollar that if the result had been 48% to 52% the other way, Nigel Farage and his ilk would not have packed up their tents and gone home. They'd have been banging on about the tragedy of half the electorate having their legitimate hopes and expectations being ignored - and arguing for some kind of compromise solution.

As a remainer, I think that's what we should be doing and (like Walter) while I disagree with Blair on many issues, on this occasion I think he's right.

It's just a bit disappointing that the only people who seem to be representing my views at the moment are Tony Blair and Vince Cable.

Add your reply
Submit as guest (your name)

Copy code captcha


Submit as member (username / password)

CANCEL
Guest: (9 days ago)

Unfortunately, Brexit is the will of people, in so far as such a thing can be gauged. Obviously you can only count the people that chose to vote (because basically everyone had a chance), and more than half of those people wanted it. It's semantics, but it's not a lie. 52% of Britons polled preferred tea to coffee (2012) so it's reasonable to say the British public prefer tea. Sure, you can harp on about how 48% didn't, and that's only the survey participants (a far smaller proportion than the referendum) but ultimately, it's a reasonable inference to make - even if you're a coffee lover.

I've said it's important that people continue to speak out (and campaign) on the subjects they feel are important. Even if it had been 75% for Brexit, remainers still have a right to continue to voice what they believe in.

But the important thing for me, is that unless there is another referendum (which I think there should be once a deal has been made), then we should leave the EU. Failure to do so would be seen (and indeed marketed by some politicans) as a wilful whitewashing of the public's views. Unless you want to cause mass political disillusionment with the electorate, you can't 'let the public decide', then override their decision. I believe politicans are there to represent their constituents, even when their constituents may not have chosen the best option, and in in a democracy if most people vote to put the collective hand into the mincer, then that's what happens.

Original comment

Unfortunately, Brexit is the will of people, in so far as such a thing can be gauged. Obviously you can only count the people that chose to vote (because basically everyone had a chance), and more than half of those people wanted it. It's semantics, but it's not a lie. 52% of Britons polled preferred tea to coffee (2012) so it's reasonable to say the British public prefer tea. Sure, you can harp on about how 48% didn't, and that's only the survey participants (a far smaller proportion than the referendum) but ultimately, it's a reasonable inference to make - even if you're a coffee lover.

I've said it's important that people continue to speak out (and campaign) on the subjects they feel are important. Even if it had been 75% for Brexit, remainers still have a right to continue to voice what they believe in.

But the important thing for me, is that unless there is another referendum (which I think there should be once a deal has been made), then we should leave the EU. Failure to do so would be seen (and indeed marketed by some politicans) as a wilful whitewashing of the public's views. Unless you want to cause mass political disillusionment with the electorate, you can't 'let the public decide', then override their decision. I believe politicans are there to represent their constituents, even when their constituents may not have chosen the best option, and in in a democracy if most people vote to put the collective hand into the mincer, then that's what happens.

Add your reply
Submit as guest (your name)

Copy code captcha


Submit as member (username / password)

CANCEL
TheBob TheBob (9 days ago)

I'm not convinced on "the will of the people". Tea v. coffee is pretty binary - and that wasn't the choice people were offered.

We were offered "would you like highly regulated, expensive tea with a lot of foreigners having the right to come over here - or would you like a wonderful alternative to tea that will make your life wonderful and rejuvenate the NHS?"

"No, we can't say exactly what that beverage is, but it's better than tea trust me."

While it would be possible to dodge/ignore/fudge the last result (it's what they did in Ireland, after all), I think you're right about having another referendum on whatever deal gets negotiated. It gives everyone a way out and might limit the number of fingers we lose altogether - but (thank you, Boris) we've already lost a couple of joints off the longer fingers.

(not sure how long this metaphor will last).

Original comment

I'm not convinced on "the will of the people". Tea v. coffee is pretty binary - and that wasn't the choice people were offered.

We were offered "would you like highly regulated, expensive tea with a lot of foreigners having the right to come over here - or would you like a wonderful alternative to tea that will make your life wonderful and rejuvenate the NHS?"

"No, we can't say exactly what that beverage is, but it's better than tea trust me."

While it would be possible to dodge/ignore/fudge the last result (it's what they did in Ireland, after all), I think you're right about having another referendum on whatever deal gets negotiated. It gives everyone a way out and might limit the number of fingers we lose altogether - but (thank you, Boris) we've already lost a couple of joints off the longer fingers.

(not sure how long this metaphor will last).

Add your reply
Submit as guest (your name)

Copy code captcha


Submit as member (username / password)

CANCEL
Guest: (9 days ago)

Eh? Pretty binary? I don't know which referendum you voted in, but I only spotted two options - remain or leave... tea or coffee. If 52% of people prefer tea, you'd probably be happy to have people say that's the will of the people. It'd be a little pedantic to quibble .

I don't think we need to be looking for a way to change the decision to leave. I think we need to be looking for ways to make it as beneficial for us as possible. If each deal that is made is no more attractive to the British public than staying in the EU while we make a new deal, then that shouldn't get accepted. If Brexiters respect the democratic process of a referendum (which seems to be the argument), then it's ludicrous to object to this.

Currently, even for hardened Brexit fans, the deals being negotiated look very weak. Hard Brexiters are annoyed that May has gone back on her promises. As Frankie Boyle said, it seems as though the people making our deals are the type of people that end up paying full price on a DFS sofa.

Original comment

Eh? Pretty binary? I don't know which referendum you voted in, but I only spotted two options - remain or leave... tea or coffee. If 52% of people prefer tea, you'd probably be happy to have people say that's the will of the people. It'd be a little pedantic to quibble .

I don't think we need to be looking for a way to change the decision to leave. I think we need to be looking for ways to make it as beneficial for us as possible. If each deal that is made is no more attractive to the British public than staying in the EU while we make a new deal, then that shouldn't get accepted. If Brexiters respect the democratic process of a referendum (which seems to be the argument), then it's ludicrous to object to this.

Currently, even for hardened Brexit fans, the deals being negotiated look very weak. Hard Brexiters are annoyed that May has gone back on her promises. As Frankie Boyle said, it seems as though the people making our deals are the type of people that end up paying full price on a DFS sofa.

Add your reply
Submit as guest (your name)

Copy code captcha


Submit as member (username / password)

CANCEL
Guest: (11 days ago)

Everyone knows that Brexit is screwing us over in the short-term. Of course it will be causing us damage to begin with... everyone but the most gullible Brexitbot knows that.

The only real question is that AFTER we've left, AFTER we've accepted the conditions made on us, AFTER all the trade deals have been negotiated, AFTER all the new legislation and laws have been passed, etc. etc, will we be in such a good position that it outweighs these years of instability and economic difficulty? We've been told yes, it will, and we've swallowed it hook, line and sinker.

So let's see.

Original comment

Everyone knows that Brexit is screwing us over in the short-term. Of course it will be causing us damage to begin with... everyone but the most gullible Brexitbot knows that.

The only real question is that AFTER we've left, AFTER we've accepted the conditions made on us, AFTER all the trade deals have been negotiated, AFTER all the new legislation and laws have been passed, etc. etc, will we be in such a good position that it outweighs these years of instability and economic difficulty? We've been told yes, it will, and we've swallowed it hook, line and sinker.

So let's see.

Add your reply
Submit as guest (your name)

Copy code captcha


Submit as member (username / password)

CANCEL
Guest: (10 days ago)

My suspicion is that he is making noise because a lot of his income derives from public speaking in Europe. He's looking out for his own interests (although I don't think he will ever be short of enough money to buy another few houses to add to his portfolio), not those of the majority of the population.

His opinion now is only worth the same as any other private citizen and he should, therefore, keep his head down and let democracy run its course, like the rest of us.

Original comment

My suspicion is that he is making noise because a lot of his income derives from public speaking in Europe. He's looking out for his own interests (although I don't think he will ever be short of enough money to buy another few houses to add to his portfolio), not those of the majority of the population.

His opinion now is only worth the same as any other private citizen and he should, therefore, keep his head down and let democracy run its course, like the rest of us.

Add your reply
Submit as guest (your name)

Copy code captcha


Submit as member (username / password)

CANCEL
Guest: (10 days ago)

I think it's not just a right but an obligation that people who feel strongly about things should use the means at their disposal to speak out. He isn't forcing anyone to believe anything - he is sharing his opinion like anyone else.

It's hilarious that so many Brexit voters get all upset when remainers point out things going wrong, as if whenever a vote goes against you, you immediately change your opinion to suit the majority.

Original comment

I think it's not just a right but an obligation that people who feel strongly about things should use the means at their disposal to speak out. He isn't forcing anyone to believe anything - he is sharing his opinion like anyone else.

It's hilarious that so many Brexit voters get all upset when remainers point out things going wrong, as if whenever a vote goes against you, you immediately change your opinion to suit the majority.

Add your reply
Submit as guest (your name)

Copy code captcha


Submit as member (username / password)

CANCEL
Guest: (10 days ago)

You're easily amused, then. I'm pointing out that Blair has no more voice than the rest of us and is silent on most matters because he is no longer a political figure - he serves his own ends which is to make vast amounts of money, much of which comes from the EU and he sees that evaporating when we leave it.

I voted for this country to leave the EU in the hope that we could do better than we were. It's going to happen now and Blair shouldn't be using his notoriety to try and throw a spanner into the works.

Original comment

You're easily amused, then. I'm pointing out that Blair has no more voice than the rest of us and is silent on most matters because he is no longer a political figure - he serves his own ends which is to make vast amounts of money, much of which comes from the EU and he sees that evaporating when we leave it.

I voted for this country to leave the EU in the hope that we could do better than we were. It's going to happen now and Blair shouldn't be using his notoriety to try and throw a spanner into the works.

Add your reply
Submit as guest (your name)

Copy code captcha


Submit as member (username / password)

CANCEL
Guest: (10 days ago)

It IS hilarious. So let's get this straight... a public figure, in fact anyone, should refuse to speak their mind once they know that a slim majority don't agree?

"Oh so THAT is what we're supposed to think? Oh my bad. I'll keep my head down then! Sorry I spoke!"

Like it or not, Blair DOES have a voice and in a democracy he is entitled to use it. Get over it. As an ex-PM who won a landslide election, then 2 elections after it, people care what he thinks. He is not going to be worried about his bank balance any time soon, either in or out of the EU. If that was his motives, then he'd forget all the charitable foundations and focus on profit. Sorry to break it to you, but it's just what he believes, along with plenty of others. Didn't you see the polls?

But hey if you think we will care about your voice as much as people care about his, get your own Youtube channel. Maybe one day BoreMe will be featuring your videos. Maybe.

Original comment

It IS hilarious. So let's get this straight... a public figure, in fact anyone, should refuse to speak their mind once they know that a slim majority don't agree?

"Oh so THAT is what we're supposed to think? Oh my bad. I'll keep my head down then! Sorry I spoke!"

Like it or not, Blair DOES have a voice and in a democracy he is entitled to use it. Get over it. As an ex-PM who won a landslide election, then 2 elections after it, people care what he thinks. He is not going to be worried about his bank balance any time soon, either in or out of the EU. If that was his motives, then he'd forget all the charitable foundations and focus on profit. Sorry to break it to you, but it's just what he believes, along with plenty of others. Didn't you see the polls?

But hey if you think we will care about your voice as much as people care about his, get your own Youtube channel. Maybe one day BoreMe will be featuring your videos. Maybe.

Add your reply
Submit as guest (your name)

Copy code captcha


Submit as member (username / password)

CANCEL
Guest: Bob Newhart (10 days ago)

Blair has more voice because he's a whole lot more experienced and knowledgeable than you and most people will ever be due to the office he held for all those years, what it took to get into it and the experience from it.

Original comment

Blair has more voice because he's a whole lot more experienced and knowledgeable than you and most people will ever be due to the office he held for all those years, what it took to get into it and the experience from it.

Add your reply
Submit as guest (your name)

Copy code captcha


Submit as member (username / password)

CANCEL
Guest: 8e53d (8 days ago)

It is absolutely nexessary that Tony Blair doesn't get any responsibility for ruling the UK again. He messed the county up in far too many ways beforehand.

Original comment

It is absolutely nexessary that Tony Blair doesn't get any responsibility for ruling the UK again. He messed the county up in far too many ways beforehand.

Add your reply
Submit as guest (your name)

Copy code captcha


Submit as member (username / password)

CANCEL
Guest: (8 days ago)
Latest comment:

Anything would be better than May's coalition of chaos

Original comment
Latest comment:

Anything would be better than May's coalition of chaos

Add your reply
Submit as guest (your name)

Copy code captcha


Submit as member (username / password)

CANCEL
Guest: Howboutthat (10 days ago)

Mr. Blair cold have lamented a threat to peace, to scientific cooperation, to unified response to climate / health / environmental threats, to advancement in political culture. But he didn't. He reflexively echoed his masters and spoke like a banker. He reflected the financial obsession of world leadership, both in office and crouching behind the throne. What the devil do they do with all the shrink-wrapped bales of currency which obsess them so, for which they gleefully sacrifice humanity's future - build play forts? Mulch? Throw it at each other? Nests?

body{zoom:96%!important;}
Original comment

Mr. Blair cold have lamented a threat to peace, to scientific cooperation, to unified response to climate / health / environmental threats, to advancement in political culture. But he didn't. He reflexively echoed his masters and spoke like a banker. He reflected the financial obsession of world leadership, both in office and crouching behind the throne. What the devil do they do with all the shrink-wrapped bales of currency which obsess them so, for which they gleefully sacrifice humanity's future - build play forts? Mulch? Throw it at each other? Nests?

body{zoom:96%!important;}
Add your reply
Submit as guest (your name)

Copy code captcha


Submit as member (username / password)

CANCEL
RELATED POSTS
Brexit, a mini documentary
Brexit, a mini documentary
Tony Blair: It's absolutely necessary that Brexit doesn't happen
Tony Blair: It's absolutely necessary that Brexit doesn't happen
Thunderf00t - Brexit 1 year on
Thunderf00t - Brexit 1 year on
Vince Cable: I'm beginning to think that Brexit may never happen
Vince Cable: I'm beginning to think that Brexit may never happen
Jacob Rees-Mogg on Question Time
Jacob Rees-Mogg on Question Time