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in.gredients, first zero-waste, package-free grocery store in the US

in.gredients, first zero-waste, package-free grocery store in the US

40% of landfill waste is packaging that's used just once. Waste is such a big looming problem that maybe this will necessarily be the future of food retail. Or is it just an impractical dream that can only feed a healthy niche and not the full-fat population?

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Guest: (2669 days ago)
If all the landfill waste in the U.S. for the next 100 years (assuming the population doubles over that time) were put in one landfill it would cover 300 square miles. Sounds big until you consider the continental US has nearly 3 million square miles of land. That makes landfill one hundredth of one percent of available land.
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If all the landfill waste in the U.S. for the next 100 years (assuming the population doubles over that time) were put in one landfill it would cover 300 square miles. Sounds big until you consider the continental US has nearly 3 million square miles of land. That makes landfill one hundredth of one percent of available land.
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Guest: (2668 days ago)
Are you volunteering to live next door to it?
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Are you volunteering to live next door to it?
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Guest: Doe (2667 days ago)
Latest comment: This is not a new concept. This is what people used to do many years ago. Take your own bags/bowls/boxes/sacks etc to the shop and use them for the goods you buy. It's just a realisation that we shouldn't have deviated from that in the first place. Only reason we did is because we're so damn lazy.
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Latest comment: This is not a new concept. This is what people used to do many years ago. Take your own bags/bowls/boxes/sacks etc to the shop and use them for the goods you buy. It's just a realisation that we shouldn't have deviated from that in the first place. Only reason we did is because we're so damn lazy.
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Guest: (2668 days ago)
Uh, the point is the US is big enough so no one need live near a landfill. In any case I already do live about two miles from a sewage treatment plant. It puts out an unpleasant odor when the wind and weather are right but it's better than having people shit in their back garden.
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Uh, the point is the US is big enough so no one need live near a landfill. In any case I already do live about two miles from a sewage treatment plant. It puts out an unpleasant odor when the wind and weather are right but it's better than having people shit in their back garden.
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WalterEgo WalterEgo (2668 days ago)
The problem of waste is much bigger than whether or not people are living near landfill sites. Pollution is of course a major issue with landfills contaminating the water table, but plastics are made from oil. It's another strong reason that keeps us locked to oil dependency which is so destructive on so many levels, both politically and environmentally. It's time we cleaned up our act, and creating less waste is a good way to start.
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The problem of waste is much bigger than whether or not people are living near landfill sites. Pollution is of course a major issue with landfills contaminating the water table, but plastics are made from oil. It's another strong reason that keeps us locked to oil dependency which is so destructive on so many levels, both politically and environmentally. It's time we cleaned up our act, and creating less waste is a good way to start.
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Guest: (2668 days ago)
I agree with the principle, I just think this is piddling. If your problem is a tornado heading your way obsessing over putting a bit of masking tape on the windows is a waste of another precious resource, time. If people just stopped acquiring crap they don't need it would do a thousand times more to reduce waste than this silly pissing about.
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I agree with the principle, I just think this is piddling. If your problem is a tornado heading your way obsessing over putting a bit of masking tape on the windows is a waste of another precious resource, time. If people just stopped acquiring crap they don't need it would do a thousand times more to reduce waste than this silly pissing about.
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Guest: Lynch (2668 days ago)
Those same people don't need the 'crap' that a lot of food/other products come in, whether they want it or not. Someone has to make a start - maybe, just maybe, the big companies might decide to join in. This may seem trivial to many, but not the people who use it regularly.
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Those same people don't need the 'crap' that a lot of food/other products come in, whether they want it or not. Someone has to make a start - maybe, just maybe, the big companies might decide to join in. This may seem trivial to many, but not the people who use it regularly.
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Guest: (2667 days ago)
For the guest who thinks this is "piddling' or 'silly pissing about'. People like you are a big part of the problem with the way reduction/recycling is treated. You are basically saying 'This isn't worth doing', if I read you right. If everyone thinks that way, nothing gets done to remedy a bad situation which is getting worse. If, on the other hand, more folks get involved in schemes like this, it can make a difference. Many people doing a small amount equals a large amount but if no-one thinks it is worth the bother (like you) we shall never know for certain.
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For the guest who thinks this is "piddling' or 'silly pissing about'. People like you are a big part of the problem with the way reduction/recycling is treated. You are basically saying 'This isn't worth doing', if I read you right. If everyone thinks that way, nothing gets done to remedy a bad situation which is getting worse. If, on the other hand, more folks get involved in schemes like this, it can make a difference. Many people doing a small amount equals a large amount but if no-one thinks it is worth the bother (like you) we shall never know for certain.
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Guest: (2667 days ago)
Now there is where you are wrong. I live in a relatively small house even though I could afford a much larger one. I grow about a third of the food my family eats in my garden. I have nursed every car Iíve ever owned until it wouldnít go on any more. I have only one television in the house. Two thirds of my heating is from wood harvested locally and I donít use air conditioning unless the temperature goes over 95 degrees Fahrenheit. I could go on but you get the picture. I do not worry about the packages the groceries I do buy come in, nor do I make any special effort to recycle (because most recycling is bullshit) because each one of these measures and a dozen more I could list has a greater environmental impact. Personally I think people who over-consume then pretend they are concerned about they environment by hyperventilating over piss-ant measures like grocery bags are the real problem.
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Now there is where you are wrong. I live in a relatively small house even though I could afford a much larger one. I grow about a third of the food my family eats in my garden. I have nursed every car Iíve ever owned until it wouldnít go on any more. I have only one television in the house. Two thirds of my heating is from wood harvested locally and I donít use air conditioning unless the temperature goes over 95 degrees Fahrenheit. I could go on but you get the picture. I do not worry about the packages the groceries I do buy come in, nor do I make any special effort to recycle (because most recycling is bullshit) because each one of these measures and a dozen more I could list has a greater environmental impact. Personally I think people who over-consume then pretend they are concerned about they environment by hyperventilating over piss-ant measures like grocery bags are the real problem.
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TheBob TheBob (2668 days ago)
Jolly good. Glad the US is catching up. "Unpackaged" (beunpackaged.com) has been going in London since 2006
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Jolly good. Glad the US is catching up. "Unpackaged" (beunpackaged.com) has been going in London since 2006
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