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The phenomenon of quantum locking

The phenomenon of quantum locking

The magic of science. Someone from Tel-Aviv University demonstrates the phenomenon of quantum locking using a superconducting magnet. Super cool!

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Guest: Richard (2493 days ago)
So...if it's locked, how can the experimenter move it into different positions?
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So...if it's locked, how can the experimenter move it into different positions?
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Guest: (2485 days ago)
Latest comment: He's superman
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Latest comment: He's superman
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glortman glortman (2492 days ago)
That is so cool. I want one!
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That is so cool. I want one!
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TheBob TheBob (2492 days ago)
Why didn't he freeze his fingers off with the liquid nitrogen?
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Why didn't he freeze his fingers off with the liquid nitrogen?
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Blong Blong (2492 days ago)
I wondered that as well. Maybe someone can explain.
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I wondered that as well. Maybe someone can explain.
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Guest: DaddyHoggy (2491 days ago)
For a short period of time (seconds) - the residual heat in the tips of the fingers would cause the nitrogen to evaporate at the point of contact - causing a vapour barrier - eventually however the fingers would cool sufficiently to stop that happening and frostbite would occur. I hope that helps?
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For a short period of time (seconds) - the residual heat in the tips of the fingers would cause the nitrogen to evaporate at the point of contact - causing a vapour barrier - eventually however the fingers would cool sufficiently to stop that happening and frostbite would occur. I hope that helps?
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Guest: Kamikaze (2492 days ago)
The surface of the object is warm enough that it can be handled safely for short periods...no worse than picking up a rock in winter. Clearly there is a limit to the strength of the locking effect...exceed that point and you can reposition the object. Way cool effect, like a magnetic equivalent of friction.
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The surface of the object is warm enough that it can be handled safely for short periods...no worse than picking up a rock in winter. Clearly there is a limit to the strength of the locking effect...exceed that point and you can reposition the object. Way cool effect, like a magnetic equivalent of friction.
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