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How attached cats are to their owners?

How attached cats are to their owners?

(4:35) Clearly, cat owners love cats, but do their cats love back? Professor Daniel Mills at the University of Lincoln carried out a series of psychological tests to see if cats are different to humans and dogs.

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Guest: A cat person (2955 days ago)
The cat simply saw through their tricks and ignored them accordingly.
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The cat simply saw through their tricks and ignored them accordingly.
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glortman glortman (2957 days ago)
There are many methodological and interpretive problems with this 'experiment'. The principle underlying assumption is that similar behaviour means the same things in different species, and that behaviour has uniform meaning across different levels of maturity. This is particularly problematic for animals in social contexts. Does moving toward a known conspecific or pack member indicate attachment to the conspecific, or anxiety? Equally in terms of maturity, human adults show attachment behaviour that is considerably different from children, and it would be unreasonable to assume that lovers do not attach to each other because they do not pine at the door when their partner leaves the room. Last there are too many variables with respect to timeframe, what is a cat's range (is the room too small/too big) the method of distraction, feeding times, length of ownership to draw any meaningful conclusions. Interesting idea, but bad science.
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There are many methodological and interpretive problems with this 'experiment'. The principle underlying assumption is that similar behaviour means the same things in different species, and that behaviour has uniform meaning across different levels of maturity. This is particularly problematic for animals in social contexts. Does moving toward a known conspecific or pack member indicate attachment to the conspecific, or anxiety? Equally in terms of maturity, human adults show attachment behaviour that is considerably different from children, and it would be unreasonable to assume that lovers do not attach to each other because they do not pine at the door when their partner leaves the room. Last there are too many variables with respect to timeframe, what is a cat's range (is the room too small/too big) the method of distraction, feeding times, length of ownership to draw any meaningful conclusions. Interesting idea, but bad science.
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Guest: Godtac (2957 days ago)
I'd agree in many respects with what you said although our musing is more subjective than the physiological tests as there is more science to suggest this experiment is not wholly wrong. Certain behaviours have been shown to be common among animals. Also I would not call it bad science, but instead call it incomplete or young science. The world of psychology and behavioural science is in an infant stage, in humans let alone animals. I have to applaud their effort at least! More of the same please.
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I'd agree in many respects with what you said although our musing is more subjective than the physiological tests as there is more science to suggest this experiment is not wholly wrong. Certain behaviours have been shown to be common among animals. Also I would not call it bad science, but instead call it incomplete or young science. The world of psychology and behavioural science is in an infant stage, in humans let alone animals. I have to applaud their effort at least! More of the same please.
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Guest: SATANIC DILDO (2957 days ago)
HA HA HA, TSUKI, YOU MANIPULATIVE FU... oh bloody hell glortman! you ruined it, with your pertinent observations! thanks a lot!
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HA HA HA, TSUKI, YOU MANIPULATIVE FU... oh bloody hell glortman! you ruined it, with your pertinent observations! thanks a lot!
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Guest: GGGGman (2955 days ago)
Latest comment: I suppose it makes sense in terms of the maturity argument. Dogs have been breed (for a couple of thousand years) to have the juvenile characteristics of wolves (playful, docile, floppy ears) as the adult characteristics aren't that desirable. That mixed with the pack mentality.
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Latest comment: I suppose it makes sense in terms of the maturity argument. Dogs have been breed (for a couple of thousand years) to have the juvenile characteristics of wolves (playful, docile, floppy ears) as the adult characteristics aren't that desirable. That mixed with the pack mentality.
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Tsuki Tsuki (2956 days ago)
I could have saved them all that trouble for just 1 can of Sheba… stupid humans!
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I could have saved them all that trouble for just 1 can of Sheba… stupid humans!
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Guest: (2956 days ago)
You aren't a cat, even if you really do eat cat food.
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You aren't a cat, even if you really do eat cat food.
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Guest: (2956 days ago)
Canines and Homo Sapiens are both (essentially) pack animals… without the pack, a sense of identity is lost in both. While felines are far more independent individuals. The researchers also don't notice (or fail to comment on the "hello tail" that the cat demonstrates on the owners return). Experiment is flawed on a number of other levels as well.
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Canines and Homo Sapiens are both (essentially) pack animals… without the pack, a sense of identity is lost in both. While felines are far more independent individuals. The researchers also don't notice (or fail to comment on the "hello tail" that the cat demonstrates on the owners return). Experiment is flawed on a number of other levels as well.
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Guest: Dave Person (2956 days ago)
They should have done the experiment with a kitten, not a full grown cat who is truly independent. A kitten would have responded more like the baby did. Basically my conclusion is that dogs are immature.
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They should have done the experiment with a kitten, not a full grown cat who is truly independent. A kitten would have responded more like the baby did. Basically my conclusion is that dogs are immature.
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