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Altaeros BAT, next generation wind power

Altaeros BAT, next generation wind power

(2:20) Altaeros Energies announces the first planned commercial demonstration of its BAT (Buoyant Airborne Turbine) wind turbine in partnership with the Alaska Energy Authority. The BAT will be deployed at 1,000 feet above ground, breaking the world record for the highest wind turbine.

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Guest: Force10Navarone (1631 days ago)

Try a hand-held catapault...

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Try a hand-held catapault...

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iknowlessthanyoudo iknowlessthanyoudo (1628 days ago)

But who will support the Koch brothers? Approval of the device would hurt sales of coal to power plants, thereby also hurting the cancer chemotherapy industry.

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But who will support the Koch brothers? Approval of the device would hurt sales of coal to power plants, thereby also hurting the cancer chemotherapy industry.

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TheBob TheBob (1631 days ago)

What a superb mismatch fom the CEO telling us how exciting it all is while looking bored out of his skull.

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What a superb mismatch fom the CEO telling us how exciting it all is while looking bored out of his skull.

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Guest: Sat (1631 days ago)

it's because he knows it's a FAILED design, very hard to implement and very dangerous. He has to talk crap to get investors.

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it's because he knows it's a FAILED design, very hard to implement and very dangerous. He has to talk crap to get investors.

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TheBob TheBob (1631 days ago)

I can imagine it could get tricky in disaster zones with lots of helicopters dodging these "barrage ballons" - but what are the other design flaws?

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I can imagine it could get tricky in disaster zones with lots of helicopters dodging these "barrage ballons" - but what are the other design flaws?

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WalterEgo WalterEgo (1631 days ago)

As you might expect, I like it. About "lots of helicopters dodging these barrage balloons" - if there are lots of helicopters, dodging each other is probably a higher risk - at least these balloons aren't moving. And, they can be positioned anywhere, so away from landing sites would make sense. It's also possible only 1 will be needed, and it might make a useful visual marker as to where a camp actually is. I rate it 10/10..

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As you might expect, I like it. About "lots of helicopters dodging these barrage balloons" - if there are lots of helicopters, dodging each other is probably a higher risk - at least these balloons aren't moving. And, they can be positioned anywhere, so away from landing sites would make sense. It's also possible only 1 will be needed, and it might make a useful visual marker as to where a camp actually is. I rate it 10/10..

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Guest: Sat (1631 days ago)

5/10 by me.

i still "believe" in thorium technology and "alternative nuclear" technologies.

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5/10 by me.

i still "believe" in thorium technology and "alternative nuclear" technologies.

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WalterEgo WalterEgo (1631 days ago)

From what I've heard about thorium, I like it too. But we can't rely on just one technology to save the world.

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From what I've heard about thorium, I like it too. But we can't rely on just one technology to save the world.

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Guest: Sat (1625 days ago)

here's an interesting one LINK

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here's an interesting one LINK

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WalterEgo WalterEgo (1624 days ago)

Yes, that is interesting. I didn't know thorium power was actually being developed on a large scale, so thumbs up for China and India.

What I like about "conventional" sustainable power (solar, wind, wave etc.) is that they are low tech and available now. I don't understand why they are supposed to be so expensive.

Here are some numbers from a quick visit to Google. Apparently, a 'single reactor' nuclear power station costs about $6 billion. Fort Calhoun nuclear plant in Nebraska is a single reactor and generates about 500 megawatts of electricity.

The Ivanpah solar plant in California cost $2.2 billion and generates about 400 megawatts.

Ongoing costs for nuclear power are significant - security, safety, acquiring uranium, waste management etc. Ongoing costs for solar is keeping the mirrors clean.

Why aren't there loads more solar thermal plants? There's no shortage of deserts. What am I missing?

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Yes, that is interesting. I didn't know thorium power was actually being developed on a large scale, so thumbs up for China and India.

What I like about "conventional" sustainable power (solar, wind, wave etc.) is that they are low tech and available now. I don't understand why they are supposed to be so expensive.

Here are some numbers from a quick visit to Google. Apparently, a 'single reactor' nuclear power station costs about $6 billion. Fort Calhoun nuclear plant in Nebraska is a single reactor and generates about 500 megawatts of electricity.

The Ivanpah solar plant in California cost $2.2 billion and generates about 400 megawatts.

Ongoing costs for nuclear power are significant - security, safety, acquiring uranium, waste management etc. Ongoing costs for solar is keeping the mirrors clean.

Why aren't there loads more solar thermal plants? There's no shortage of deserts. What am I missing?

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Guest: Sat (1624 days ago)
Latest comment:

well thorium based powerplants are not going to be as expensive as current ones.

The solar wind etc alternative energy is available to all right now, but the problem is securing patents. The major manufacturers (GE, siemens, haliburton, etc) along with other industries are pushing for TPP and TTIP to secure the patents, including the ones for new tech and renewables.

Current renewable energy devices are built for planned obsolescense.

And then there's this LINK

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Latest comment:

well thorium based powerplants are not going to be as expensive as current ones.

The solar wind etc alternative energy is available to all right now, but the problem is securing patents. The major manufacturers (GE, siemens, haliburton, etc) along with other industries are pushing for TPP and TTIP to secure the patents, including the ones for new tech and renewables.

Current renewable energy devices are built for planned obsolescense.

And then there's this LINK

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Guest: Sat (1631 days ago)

sure. but it can be the main one, instead of fossil fuels.

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sure. but it can be the main one, instead of fossil fuels.

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Guest: Guest God (1631 days ago)

What does Bible say about this? Would Jesus love this too?

Would work efficiently on an atheist ass after a bean meal.

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What does Bible say about this? Would Jesus love this too?

Would work efficiently on an atheist ass after a bean meal.

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Guest: Sat (1631 days ago)

i am conflicted between actually replying OR ignoring your comment, so i'm leaving this text instead.

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i am conflicted between actually replying OR ignoring your comment, so i'm leaving this text instead.

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Guest: Sat (1631 days ago)

the lines could snap in powerfull storms.

you need a computerized platform to manage the lines, or a human being: the computers go kaput (always) , but it only takes one that goes rogue and starts crashing in the other blimps, and human management is expensive...

there's only so much they can build before the price of helium goes up up up, and they have to switch to hydrogen. Helium existss only in a limited ammount on planet earth, and it's being used for other applications.

Helicopters and planes, you mentioned that.

If the line snaps, one can be carried away and crash on people or houses.

Basically, it doesn't offer security in the traditional sense of the word.

At least , that's how i see it and it's my best guest for the reason behind his lack of enthusiasm.

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the lines could snap in powerfull storms.

you need a computerized platform to manage the lines, or a human being: the computers go kaput (always) , but it only takes one that goes rogue and starts crashing in the other blimps, and human management is expensive...

there's only so much they can build before the price of helium goes up up up, and they have to switch to hydrogen. Helium existss only in a limited ammount on planet earth, and it's being used for other applications.

Helicopters and planes, you mentioned that.

If the line snaps, one can be carried away and crash on people or houses.

Basically, it doesn't offer security in the traditional sense of the word.

At least , that's how i see it and it's my best guest for the reason behind his lack of enthusiasm.

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WalterEgo WalterEgo (1631 days ago)

I don't think it's fair to assume the lines might snap. After all, it's theoretically possible to build a space elevator using carbon nanotubes.

I don't see the problem with computerisation. Everything is computerised these days, including the rescue helicopters.

But the shortage of helium is a problem. Thing is, we're still filling party balloons with it. Helium, being the 2nd most common element in the universe (but rare on Earth) might be synthesizable in the forseeable future, especially if the demand for it is high.

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I don't think it's fair to assume the lines might snap. After all, it's theoretically possible to build a space elevator using carbon nanotubes.

I don't see the problem with computerisation. Everything is computerised these days, including the rescue helicopters.

But the shortage of helium is a problem. Thing is, we're still filling party balloons with it. Helium, being the 2nd most common element in the universe (but rare on Earth) might be synthesizable in the forseeable future, especially if the demand for it is high.

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Guest: Sat (1631 days ago)

by synthesizing helium you mean.... fuze 2 hydrogen atoms together, right?

anyway, i disagree, i think those problems are real and i think a lot of other people/investors see it the same way.

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by synthesizing helium you mean.... fuze 2 hydrogen atoms together, right?

anyway, i disagree, i think those problems are real and i think a lot of other people/investors see it the same way.

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