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Arctic and Antarctic respond differently to global warming

Arctic and Antarctic respond differently to global warming

(1:43) Overall, the planet is warming, but as the Arctic ice melts, Antarctica's sea ice is expanding and setting new records. Why this is happening is a mystery. One suggestion is that it's to do with the geography of the region and the fact that ice expands. More...

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Ace7 Ace7 (2211 days ago)

Global warming; it's happening and humans are making it happen faster. Sure there are some people who deny it but there are also people that deny man ever went to the moon.

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Global warming; it's happening and humans are making it happen faster. Sure there are some people who deny it but there are also people that deny man ever went to the moon.

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guest123456789 guest123456789 (2211 days ago)

Warming temperatures do not always mean melting ice. Try this experiment. Set your freezer to -40C and put some liquid water in it. The water will turn to ice. Increase the temperature to -30C. How much of that ice melted? Answer: Zero

The guy that said the arctic and antarctic reflect a lot of light from the sun is wrong. It may reflect some light but due to the solar angles in those regions, they do not get as much light as the rest of the planet so they don’t get as much sun. That’s why they are colder in those areas than the rest of the planet. When you are at the poles, the sun disappears from view for six months so all you get is twilight. Not much light gets reflected when very little light even reaches that part of the planet.

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Warming temperatures do not always mean melting ice. Try this experiment. Set your freezer to -40C and put some liquid water in it. The water will turn to ice. Increase the temperature to -30C. How much of that ice melted? Answer: Zero

The guy that said the arctic and antarctic reflect a lot of light from the sun is wrong. It may reflect some light but due to the solar angles in those regions, they do not get as much light as the rest of the planet so they don’t get as much sun. That’s why they are colder in those areas than the rest of the planet. When you are at the poles, the sun disappears from view for six months so all you get is twilight. Not much light gets reflected when very little light even reaches that part of the planet.

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Ace7 Ace7 (2211 days ago)

...but in Earths reality warming does mean melting. The earth is not a static environment as is the freezer. If, hypothetically, there is a rise of 10 deg at the pole wich is -40 it will move to -30. No melt. But as you move towards the equator eventually you will reach the point whereby the temperature is shifted between -5 and +5. Melt.

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...but in Earths reality warming does mean melting. The earth is not a static environment as is the freezer. If, hypothetically, there is a rise of 10 deg at the pole wich is -40 it will move to -30. No melt. But as you move towards the equator eventually you will reach the point whereby the temperature is shifted between -5 and +5. Melt.

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guest123456789 guest123456789 (2211 days ago)

Do you have any idea what the average temperatures are at the poles? Better question. What is the maximum temperature it gets at the poles during the hottest time of the year?

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Do you have any idea what the average temperatures are at the poles? Better question. What is the maximum temperature it gets at the poles during the hottest time of the year?

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Ace7 Ace7 (2208 days ago)

Are you suggesting that if a 10 deg shift would not melt ice at the south pole it would not melt ice anywhere else? What about 1000km away? Does that count?

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Are you suggesting that if a 10 deg shift would not melt ice at the south pole it would not melt ice anywhere else? What about 1000km away? Does that count?

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guest123456789 guest123456789 (2207 days ago)
Latest comment:

There has only been 1/2 degree C warming since 1940 and only 1 C since the 1800’s. So nobody was talking about a 10 degree shift.

Anyway, did you know that sea water has salt in it so it freezes at a different temperature than fresh water? It freezes at 28.4F / -2C. Now for the interesting part. When the sea water freezes, only the water freezes and the salt is left behind so there is very little salt left in the ice. You can melt the ice to make drinking water.

Now that there is very little salt left in the ice, the temperature must be higher than 0C for it to melt.

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Latest comment:

There has only been 1/2 degree C warming since 1940 and only 1 C since the 1800’s. So nobody was talking about a 10 degree shift.

Anyway, did you know that sea water has salt in it so it freezes at a different temperature than fresh water? It freezes at 28.4F / -2C. Now for the interesting part. When the sea water freezes, only the water freezes and the salt is left behind so there is very little salt left in the ice. You can melt the ice to make drinking water.

Now that there is very little salt left in the ice, the temperature must be higher than 0C for it to melt.

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Guest: originalmad (2208 days ago)

The Ice in antarctica isn't melting, its too cold for that, however there is a process called sublimation, but the rate of sublimation in antarctica that will be related to solar insolation and humidity, nothing to do with co2.

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The Ice in antarctica isn't melting, its too cold for that, however there is a process called sublimation, but the rate of sublimation in antarctica that will be related to solar insolation and humidity, nothing to do with co2.

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WalterEgo WalterEgo (2208 days ago)

Just a thought about your -40C to -30C example. An increase of 10C may not melt ice, but the ice may increase because it expands as it warms up. I'm not sure that is true. Does anyone know? Is the volume of ice in a freezer at -10c less than in a freezer at -5C?

According to the Brirtish Antarctic Survey, Antarctica is warming around the edges but cooling in the centre. Overall it is hardly changing. Interestingly, climate models predict amplified warming in the Arctic, but not the Antarctic. LINK

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Just a thought about your -40C to -30C example. An increase of 10C may not melt ice, but the ice may increase because it expands as it warms up. I'm not sure that is true. Does anyone know? Is the volume of ice in a freezer at -10c less than in a freezer at -5C?

According to the Brirtish Antarctic Survey, Antarctica is warming around the edges but cooling in the centre. Overall it is hardly changing. Interestingly, climate models predict amplified warming in the Arctic, but not the Antarctic. LINK

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guest123456789 guest123456789 (2207 days ago)

As you lower the temperature of water, it shrinks just like every other compound. Then, it starts to expand at about 4 degrees C and continues to expand slightly until 0 C (at sea level). It only expands an additional 9%.

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As you lower the temperature of water, it shrinks just like every other compound. Then, it starts to expand at about 4 degrees C and continues to expand slightly until 0 C (at sea level). It only expands an additional 9%.

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Guest: originalmad (2208 days ago)

Yawn, so someone has changed wikipedia (probably william connolley, i will check) to reflect the current cant, after a good couple of years of the cagw cultists refusing to acknowledge the increased ice, which was counter to the models predictions. Walter, because an activist has changed wikipedia, doesn't make it true, and btw Antactica isn't warming around the edges, its quite clearly colder (the increased ice in the area is a good indicator)

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Yawn, so someone has changed wikipedia (probably william connolley, i will check) to reflect the current cant, after a good couple of years of the cagw cultists refusing to acknowledge the increased ice, which was counter to the models predictions. Walter, because an activist has changed wikipedia, doesn't make it true, and btw Antactica isn't warming around the edges, its quite clearly colder (the increased ice in the area is a good indicator)

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WalterEgo WalterEgo (2208 days ago)

I trust the British Antarctic Survey more than I trust you.

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I trust the British Antarctic Survey more than I trust you.

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Guest: originalmad (2208 days ago)

Hmmn,but you shouldn.t trust wikpedia, it is prone to only presenting one viewpoint. Btw, there have been two recent papers pointing to the increased geothermal activity in antarctica, as the main culprit of the glacier melt, and yes they are peer reviewed

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Hmmn,but you shouldn.t trust wikpedia, it is prone to only presenting one viewpoint. Btw, there have been two recent papers pointing to the increased geothermal activity in antarctica, as the main culprit of the glacier melt, and yes they are peer reviewed

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