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A year in the life of Earth's CO2

A year in the life of Earth's CO2

(3:11) NASA climate scientist Bill Putman takes a look at their new computer model GEOS-5 that shows how carbon dioxide in the atmosphere travels around the globe.

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MyName MyName (2134 days ago)

That's a pretty bleak looking visualisation.

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That's a pretty bleak looking visualisation.

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TheBob TheBob (2134 days ago)

So this starts in January with fairly low levels of CO2. Then CO2 builds a bit then drops as plants take it up. From autumn the CO2 levels increase and by December it looks pretty horrific.

So why are the January and December levels so different?

Are they implying it's got so much worse over the year?

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So this starts in January with fairly low levels of CO2. Then CO2 builds a bit then drops as plants take it up. From autumn the CO2 levels increase and by December it looks pretty horrific.

So why are the January and December levels so different?

Are they implying it's got so much worse over the year?

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WalterEgo WalterEgo (2134 days ago)

It's probably not as dramatic as it looks. If you watch on YT at hi res, full screen, the legend in the bottom right corner shows what the colours mean. The range is from 377 ppm to 395 ppm.

The dark blue, most of the southern hemisphere, is about 380 ppm. The reds are around 384 ppm, the purple 387 ppm.

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It's probably not as dramatic as it looks. If you watch on YT at hi res, full screen, the legend in the bottom right corner shows what the colours mean. The range is from 377 ppm to 395 ppm.

The dark blue, most of the southern hemisphere, is about 380 ppm. The reds are around 384 ppm, the purple 387 ppm.

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guest123456789 guest123456789 (2134 days ago)

Sounds just like the hockey puck graph. The scale is so small that it looks like a huge temperature increase.

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Sounds just like the hockey puck graph. The scale is so small that it looks like a huge temperature increase.

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WalterEgo WalterEgo (2134 days ago)

Sounds like you don't pay enough attention to detail. The visualisation shows CO2 concentrations, not temperature.

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Sounds like you don't pay enough attention to detail. The visualisation shows CO2 concentrations, not temperature.

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guest123456789 guest123456789 (2134 days ago)

If you paid careful attention to my wording, you would notice I said, “just like.”

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If you paid careful attention to my wording, you would notice I said, “just like.”

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WalterEgo WalterEgo (2134 days ago)

Fair enough. When you said "The scale is so small..." I thought your were referring to the visualisation, not the hockey stick.

Talking of which, Mann's hockey stick graph goes back 1,000 years and the same scale is used throughout. LINK

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Fair enough. When you said "The scale is so small..." I thought your were referring to the visualisation, not the hockey stick.

Talking of which, Mann's hockey stick graph goes back 1,000 years and the same scale is used throughout. LINK

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